Load persistant Mint to SSD

All Gurus once were Newbies
Forum rules
There are no such things as "stupid" questions. However if you think your question is a bit stupid, then this is the right place for you to post it. Please stick to easy to-the-point questions that you feel people can answer fast. For long and complicated questions prefer the other forums within the support section.
Before you post please read how to get help
Post Reply
journeyman3000
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:01 pm

Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by journeyman3000 » Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:22 pm

Hello all

Having a rough time with this. I'm attempting to create a second OS in an SSD LM 18.3. The idea being that all I need to do is plug in the SSD to the port and fire up and away I go. I want to us Mint as an OS on which I can save my preferences, applications and so on.

Now Ive come to understand this is called persistent live.

So I have done the following.

1. Setup the Bios to open the USB
2. Installed from another USB to the SSD. All kinds of partitioning garbage was involved. Eventually, I got the swap partition as logical and the main partition as primary with a couple free spaces. I used:
Universal-USB-Installer-1.9.8.1
Unetbootin
3. Danced naked in the moonlight having sacrificed my firstborn to the Linux gods. Granted, not a good look but had to be done right?

I installed a live version on one USB and then using the install program, attempted to install a full version on the SSD. After messing around with trying to figure out partitions and all that kind of thing, I eventually got a swap partition (logical) of 10gb, and the main partition (Primary) of 240gb. plus two fee space partitions.

Still, the bios is not recognising the SSD. and the Laptop still loads to windows.

My laptop will not open mint. It literally tell me to F#$% Off on loading, then proceeds to the windows OS on the main disk.

So the live version is useless to me. I need the OS to store and hold information.

So there has got to be some secret to doing it. Can somebody please provide a program or a complete set of instructions how to create a complete Mint install on a seperate SSD, such that it functions similarly to to installing it to my main laptop drive and maintains any installed apps, such as chromuim.

Cheers and advance thanks

Ill also add that some instructions ive seen call for me to creat partions in gparted, but I can't even set a mount point. its grey out, so I don't know. ready to hurl this garbage to the four winds.

User avatar
Superannuated
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 303
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2015 1:18 am
Location: UTC -8 :: Pacific Coast USA

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by Superannuated » Sat Apr 28, 2018 12:25 am

While you are waiting for a better answer, here are a couple of videos and a thread to get you going.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbdAmJ5jzfM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glFCEauwGgw
viewtopic.php?t=243723

In the first video a separate partition is made for "home". In this video things are a bit different because he has a partition for backup data that he doesn't want to erase. You don't have that concern.
In the second video root and home are in the same partition, which may be easier for beginners.
The LM thread discusses issues such as UEFI vs BIOS.

Mute Ant
Level 14
Level 14
Posts: 5135
Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 7:45 pm
Location: Norfolk UK

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by Mute Ant » Sat Apr 28, 2018 6:38 am

"Now I've come to understand this is called persistent live." Err no. If you run the Mint installer, the result is not a Live Session.

My preferred Live Session is writing the ISO directly into the start of a drive.
[+] DVD or USB Stick or Disk or SSD all use the same unmodified distribution boot code.
[+] You use the ISO without any modification at all. Malware-proof, it just boots.
[+] You can allocate the unused space as a partition.
[+] You can add persistence after the bare Live Session has started, your way, instead of their way.
Some of those benefits are part-of-the-package with the TAILS or Knoppix distributions. Write the ISO to a store and boot the store. That's it.
[-] Booting the unmodified ISO you only get the kernel and graphics of a standard distribution.
[-] You need to understand your own persistence mechanism to apply it after each boot.
While you're waiting, read the free novel we sent you. It's a Spanish story about a guy named "manual".

journeyman3000
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:01 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by journeyman3000 » Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:53 am

Ok so thanks for the response Mute Ant

All this sounds like it might be golden. So the question I have is How? How do you do this stuff. This is why I was hoping for a program that I can just run.

As it is the stupid pen drive installer, doesn't install anything but a load of junk on your drive. The drive doesn't start up or anything. It apparently has something call persistence on it, but it doesn't do squat.

So in the failure of a program that does stuff automatically. what steps do I need to take to do it?

I've spent a who day reading all kinds of stuff on google and messing around with partitions and wotnot. Still no closer to getting an SSD drive to boot at startup.

User avatar
michael louwe
Level 10
Level 10
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2016 11:18 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by michael louwe » Sat Apr 28, 2018 8:37 am

@ journeyman3000, .......
journeyman3000 wrote:.
.
Normally, to install LM on a computer's internal hard-drive, we first need to download the LM ISO file. Then we need to use a writing or burning program to write/burn the ISO file onto a DVD or USB Flash-drive to make a bootable Live LM DVD/USB, eg Rufus, Unetbootin, USB Image Writer, Etcher, Universal USB Installer, Imgburn, etc.

Then we need to configure the computer's BIOS Setup to boot the Live LM DVD/USB, usually to do a test-drive of LM. If everything is OK with the test-drive, we then proceed to do the install proper on the computer's internal hard-drive, or external USB hard-drive.
....... Once install of LM has completed, we need to reconfigure the computer's BIOS Setup to boot from the internal hard-drive after unplugging or removing the Live LM DVD/USB.

Normally, the Live LM USB Flash-drive does not have persistence or persistent storage. During the creation of the Live LM USB with an ISO writing/burning program, we can add persistence or persistent storage to it. Running or test-driving a Live LM USB with persistence, we can save/store our system/app settings and installed apps/programs which will persist through reboots while still retaining the ability to do an install of LM on the computer if we so choose.

Superannuated's link at forums.linuxmint is a good guide for installing LM on an external USB hard-drive.(the manual "Something else" install method should be used)

User avatar
pbear
Level 9
Level 9
Posts: 2681
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:25 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by pbear » Sat Apr 28, 2018 12:07 pm

journeyman3000 wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:22 pm
Now Ive come to understand this is called persistent live.
As others have said, what you're trying to do isn't called loading a persistent drive. It's called full install to a USB drive. Indeed, given your situation and the fact that you have a nice-sized external SSD available for the task, full install to USB drive is what you WANT to do. I'd be happy to give detailed instructions, but need to know whether your computer uses BIOS or UEFI, as there are important differences in procedure as between the two. If you're not sure, a quick-and-dirty way to tell is by whether it originally came with Win7 or earlier (which would be BIOS) or Win8 or later (which generally would be UEFI).
Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
If your problem has been solved, please edit the thread title.

journeyman3000
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:01 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by journeyman3000 » Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:04 pm

Thanks for the response pbear and all others

I have managed to run the live version at startup. So I did that by the settings in the BIOS. but of course, anything I wanted to do wanted to do wasn't saved.

So basically, I have an SSD drive connected to a USB 3 port. I want the computer to startup into the linux Mint OS whenever this drive is connected, and for that OS to function normally, in which I can store setting and save applications as required.

I should add that I'm running an HP 360 laptop with Win 10 - HP X360 11-AB030TU X360.

Thanks for continued assistance.

Cheers

I gotta say this whole things is totally retarded. I installed the live version on a USB with 4gb persistence using Lili USB creator, and the network connections was greyed out. Some bizarre technical crap came up instead of an available network list. Secondly, gparted won't allow me to mount a partition to /boot. Mount is greyed out. Third, even after installing from the USB, the SSD is not recognised at all. It simply will not boot into it in the same way the the USB live version does. Just does not want to work. It's retarded how hard this is, every instruction I've ever read is rubbish. Just doesn't work at all.
Last edited by journeyman3000 on Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
pbear
Level 9
Level 9
Posts: 2681
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:25 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by pbear » Sat Apr 28, 2018 11:25 pm

I understand exactly what you're trying to do and spent a lot of time figuring out how to do it. Apologies if this looks complicated, but I’ve tried to mention everything. In fact, it only takes about half an hour, plus the time to run the installer (another half hour or so, depending on your internet connection).

Broadly speaking, this is like a regular install with two differences. One, to install to a USB drive, you have to use the “Something Else” method and select options manually. Two, you have to use an alternate boot loader because yours is a UEFI system and the installer will screw up your Windows bootloader if you use the regular method. This is a known bug, not yet repaired, but easily gotten around by the method described below (based on this post by fabien85), which installs the rEFInd boot manager (about) instead of Grub. Importantly, rEFInd is installed only to the USB drive, not your internal, and only gets used when the USB drive is attached. FYI, there’s another workaround strategy, which I describe in this thread, but the one I’m recommending here is better suited to your situation.

First, you need a clean live boot ISO. It’s not clear to me whether you have one. Certainly the LiLi USB you mention isn’t clean, as that utility last supported LM version 17.2 (you should have gotten a warning, I did, when trying to use). To eliminate any doubt, I recommend you download Rufus, a portable which runs in Windows and use that to burn (or reburn) the ISO. This isn’t a persistent drive, but you don’t need one for what we’re doing. By the way, the flash drive you use for this purpose can be as small as 2 GB.

Second, boot the live session. Set up internet connection. Change date and time to reflect location (default is London). Turn off screensaver and display shutoff (a power management setting). Open Firefox, navigate to the Forum and open this thread for reference.

Third, attach the SSD. Now let’s redo the partition scheme (which will overwrite the present faulty installation). You can do this with the installer, but it’s easier and better to use GParted. So, open that from Menu. In the upper right of the main window, there’s a drop-down to select which drive you want to modify. Your SSD should be sdc (where the internal is sda and the live USB is sdb). Create a new partition table in target USB drive, specifying gpt type. Set up three partitions: #1: 200MB (format fat32); #2: [remaining space after swap] (format ext4); #3: 8 GB [or as appropriate, generally at least equal to RAM] (format linux-swap). Apply. Right-click partition #1 and set “boot” and “esp” flags; close GParted.

Note: Many advanced users prefer to set up separate root and home partitions. Main advantage is that this makes it possible to upgrade or switch the operating system without having to redo settings, recopy data files, etc. OTOH, having only a root partition is easier (home becomes a folder) and eliminates a potential problem of one partition or the other turning out to be too small. Notably, most old recommendations for size of root fail to consider Timeshift (a system backup app), which doubles the space needed.

Fourth, install Mint. Open Terminal; run ubiquity -b, which will bring up the installer (don’t use the desktop icon). Initiate install to target USB drive using the “Something Else” option. (Don’t unmount partitions when asked.) Select sdc2; click Change; Use as: Ext4 system (but don’t tick format box) and select mount point as root (“/”) (annoyingly, you can’t see the mount point option until you’ve selected “use as”). FYI, if you’ve looked at other tutorials, unlike a regular install, because of the -b tag, there’s no option to designate a destination for the bootloader. Double-check not making any changes to the internal hard drive. Run install (confirm no format of #2, but yes format swap), selecting other options as preferred (for more info, see the Official Installation Guide).

Fifth, install rEFInd boot manager. When install completes, choose continue session. Return to Firefox; open a new tab; copy in URL for rEFInd download page and download “binary zip file” (currently, version 0.11.2); close tab. Open File Manager, navigate to Download folder and extract (unzip) package; close File Manager. Return to Terminal. Navigate to folder with unzipped files, e.g., cd Downloads/refind-bin-0.11.2/. Install rEFInd to the target USB drive with the following command: ./refind-install --alldrivers --usedefault /dev/sdc1 (assuming, as mentioned, that sdc is the SSD); notice the period before /refind-install, without which the command won’t work.

Shutdown live session and remove live USB. Boot the SSD (which now becomes sdb, by the way, as those labels are assigned dynamically). You should get a rEFInd boot menu listing all installed operating systems, including the new USB drive. Toggle with arrow keys to select, then Enter to boot. Understand you have more work to do, especially as regards settings and installing software, but you’re off to the races.

One not-obvious thing to change is setting Mint to use the system clock rather than universal time. (Otherwise, every time you boot the USB it will reset the system clock, which then has to be reset again in Windows from Control Panel.) In Terminal, run timedatectl set-local-rtc 1. With this change, the Linux system will no longer be able to monitor daylight savings time changes, but this doesn't matter because Windows will take care of that.

Feel free to ask questions, but the best way to understand this is to do it. Good luck.

[ETA: Out of curiosity, did another install to USB drive per the above instructions. Went through fine, confirming my suspicion the OP made a mistake. Did notice, though, I had the system clock change as Step 6, while still booted to the live session. Actually, it's the installed system which needs to be changed, so I've edited the instructions to fix.]
Last edited by pbear on Mon May 14, 2018 1:20 pm, edited 4 times in total.
Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
If your problem has been solved, please edit the thread title.

journeyman3000
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:01 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by journeyman3000 » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:47 pm

Thanks pBear.

I shall follow these instruction explicitly this evening when i get home from work.

I think I see the failing and the frustration in the the supposed installers have a bug and failed to do their job on the new system. I could have save myself the frustration of all this, except that I didn't want to dual boot with windows.

Anyway, I shall follow these instructions and let you know how I go. thanks!

User avatar
pbear
Level 9
Level 9
Posts: 2681
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:25 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by pbear » Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:49 pm

Actually, the regular method for full install works fine when installing in UEFI to an internal drive. It even works fine installing in UEFI to a USB drive insofar as the system is concerned. Where it falls down in a USB install in UEFI (but doesn't in BIOS) is that it messes up the internal hard drive's EFI bootloader, so we have to use a workaround. I've edited my post to clarify the problem. Anyhoo, good luck and hope it works out.
Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
If your problem has been solved, please edit the thread title.

User avatar
michael louwe
Level 10
Level 10
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2016 11:18 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by michael louwe » Mon Apr 30, 2018 4:04 am

@ journeyman3000, .......
journeyman3000 wrote:.
.
https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295 (UEFI Installing - Tips )(see Two Drives Install)

[For installing Linux on an external USB hard-drive, a workaround is to unplug the Win 8.x/10 internal hard-drive and install LM on the external USB hard-drive = plug in the external USB hard-drive only when you want to boot LM.]
Last edited by michael louwe on Mon Apr 30, 2018 5:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

journeyman3000
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:01 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by journeyman3000 » Mon Apr 30, 2018 4:47 am

Thanks Micheal,

Sounds good, but this is a laptop and not easy to pull apart just to disconnect the HDD.

Cheers Tho!

journeyman3000
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:01 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by journeyman3000 » Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:12 am

So all night later...

Followed the instructions to the letter. Key difference was the SDC mentioned in your post was SDB. the key wasn't recognised. still should have worked. I was all geared up and ready for the win, but super massive let down to see windows boot up. seriously crushed.

So, this is f@%#ed. One of the key problem was that cinamon didn't wanna play nice with the network and wouldn't detect any networks. all the came up was Network Settings and Network configuration, neither of which displayed the network but seemed to want all kinds of tech crap. In the end I got 18.3 Mate and installed that using Rufus, and the network finally showed up. Then I was able to download the bits I needed. Installed to SDB1 and reloaded. no go. So I don't know. throw the laptop out the window maybe. Might be the best solution. I'll try it all again after the feeling of total disillusionment passes and see how we go.

User avatar
pbear
Level 9
Level 9
Posts: 2681
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:25 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by pbear » Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:52 am

Can't think of a good explanation for the sdb thing, but pretty sure it's not possible for the live session not to be able to detect the device from which it was booted. Also don't know why Cinnamon had trouble with the wifi connection but Mate not, unless you were still using the old burn of Cinnamon (which is why I recommended burning a clean one as the first step).

Not much point pushing through all the steps again, IMHO, until you figure out where you're going sideways. What you could try is the alternate strategy mentioned in my post. Note for that one you have to boot the live session in BIOS mode (aka legacy boot or CSM), then install the EFI bootloader manually. This method uses Grub rather than rEFInd, so you would be trying something different.

Or you could reasonably conclude at this point you've given Linux a fair try and it came up short. Frankly, I think it's absurd the installation bug hasn't been fixed (was identified years ago), but it is what it is. By the way, Ubuntu has the same problem, indeed is the source of the problem in MInt.

[Edited to fix link. Thanks, Superannuated, for pointing out.]
Last edited by pbear on Mon Apr 30, 2018 4:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
If your problem has been solved, please edit the thread title.

User avatar
Superannuated
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 303
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2015 1:18 am
Location: UTC -8 :: Pacific Coast USA

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by Superannuated » Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:33 pm

Thanks to pbear for providing two solutions to the problem of installing a UEFI-compatible LM OS to an external USB drive. [I wasn't aware of the Ubuntu installer bug for external drives.] I already had a BIOS-compatible USB stick with LM on it that worked well with my legacy computers, but I never had the occasion to plug into a UEFI machine.

Last night I reinstalled LM18.3 Xfce using pbear's alternate procedure for booting with either BIOS or UEFI. The installation worked perfectly. The USB stick boots great on my legacy computer, but I need to find a UEFI computer to try it out. By the way, I don't think the link in the quote below is correct. I believe you want to link here.
pbear wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:52 am
What you could try is the alternate strategy mentioned in my post.
Update: I tried my USB stick on a UEFI computer today and it worked great after turning off Secure Boot.

journeyman3000
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:01 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by journeyman3000 » Wed May 02, 2018 7:32 pm

Hello all,

So I finally got persistence with Ubuntu installed to an SSD. This was the method I used. I did this last night, so wrote this from memory the next day. Mostly it should be right.

How to install a persistence live version of Linux Ubuntu on SSD using MKSub
Purpose:
To install a persistence live version of Linux Ubuntu onto SSD.
Using MkSub allows for the creation for a persistence partition of any reasonable size, rather than be limited to a 4gb file. This means that the live version can be installed to and run from a high volume SSD with a much large persistence capacity.
The SSD tested was Gen 1 (USB 3.0), which permits transfer speed to 5 gbps. Note: I didn’t notice any particular increase in speed over a USB, except when a program had previously been run. However, Wi-Fi details, passwords, webpages, bookmarks, application installations and various downloads were saved. It is claimed that a full install will be faster, however a full install to SSD did not work at all, leading to the requirement for a Persistence Live SSD. There was no noticeable speed increase in loading applications or games using SSD, but then this solution was only ever considered for internet use.
The use of MKsub provides for a single install point that does not require the use of Gparted to modify partition size not does it required any additional installations into boot partitions.

Required:
• USB drive – used for the initial install of Ubuntu, and the download of MKSub
• SSD drive – the target drive.
• Linux Live USB creator (Download) – used to install the initial live version to USB.
• Ubuntu ISO file – Used to install the live version to USB and later to SSD.

Expectations
This is a long winded process requiring the installation of a live version of Linux onto a USB, from which you can install and run MKSub to create the Persistent Live version to SSD. You may also install a full version, but this was not tested.
This was tested on a UEFI system with the main HDD running windows 10.

Process
1. Download Ubuntu ISO.
• This was tested with Ubuntu, but it may function with other distributions also.
https://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

2. Download and install Linux Live USB creator
https://www.pendrivelinux.com/linux-live-usb-creator/

3. Ensure that the USB and SSD are both formatted and visible on windows. That is it has a partition already setup.

4. Run Linux Live USB Creator

• Choose your USB key. A USB must be previously formatted and inserted into your PC or laptop
• Choose your source. This will be the Ubuntu ISO previously downloaded.
• Set persistence. This is not required unless you want this on your USB. Set to 4gb.
• Format the key to Fat 32. Uncheck hide created files. Uncheck Enabled launching in Windows
• Click Create.

5. Restart the system, ensure that the Linux will boot from the USB key. Ubuntu should start. If it doesn’t you may need to use another ISO installer.

6. In Ubuntu, download and install MKSub (Version 12)
• For more information go to: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/mkusb. It's not easy to read this or understand what a newbie needs to do, but it's better than nothing.
• Setup the internet or Wi-Fi.
• Open the terminal and for each line type the following:
sudo add-apt-repository universe
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mkusb/ppa (Then press [Enter])
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mkusb mkusb-nox usb-pack-efi

• This should run mkusb-dus. Further MKSub installation requirements (such as upgrading) may be needed so refer to the webpage detailed above for information
• Close the terminal.

7. Run MKSub
• In your USB version of Linux, go to your Application Menu and locate MKSub from search.
• Do not use MKSub Nox unless you are comfortable with text based commands.
• Ensure that your SSD is now plugged in.
• Run MKSub
• Follow the onscreen instructions.
• On screen instructions will request the SSD to use, the partition size for persistence and so on. Make your selections here.

8. Turn off your PC completely.

9. Remove the Original USB. Keep the SSD plugged in.

10. Turn the PC back on. If successful, the initial Ubuntu boot selections will display.

11. Set up some values in internet, setup the internet or Wi-Fi, install a file, or make a general change. Restart your machine to confirm persistence.

So as I said, I did this the following day so if I messed up a step, feel free to advise. It's a lot of BS doing it and it took me a lot of goes with other live creators and messing around with partitions before i discovered this method. So doing this is not easy, and it's not guaranteed. Note to Linux designers - get your $hit together and make a proper install method for UEFI systems.

Hope this helps in some small way.
Last edited by journeyman3000 on Wed May 02, 2018 9:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
AZgl1500
Level 11
Level 11
Posts: 3681
Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2015 3:20 am
Location: Oklahoma where the wind comes sweeping down the plains
Contact:

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by AZgl1500 » Wed May 02, 2018 8:40 pm

Documentation that explains the "why" and "how" of Linux is almost non-existent.

if it were not for this Forum, I would still be using Winders :evil: :evil: :evil:

app developers just make some light comment that if you download this tar ball, and install it, you are good to go?

huh? WTH is a tar ball, and what do I do with it?

I think that I am going to sign up for this course, and see if it can push anything thru my 75 y/o thinking cells.

https://courses.edx.org/courses/course- ... 17/course/

User avatar
pbear
Level 9
Level 9
Posts: 2681
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:25 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by pbear » Wed May 02, 2018 10:44 pm

There are many reasons not to rely on a persistent drive, especially difficulty updating apps and the impossibility of updating kernels, but if one is going to, there's a much simpler way to do this with mkUSB in Mint.

Also, I will reiterate a point I made earlier. No one at this point should be using the Linux Live USB Creator. It's been abandoned by its developer (see comment 2/3's down page) and last worked correctly with LM 17.2. Rather, Windows users looking to burn a plain USB (no persistence) should use Rufus or Etcher. For simple persistence (limited to 4 GB), use UUI or MBU. mkUSB doesn't work in Windows, but can be installed to a live session booted from a USB created by any of the other four.
Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
If your problem has been solved, please edit the thread title.

User avatar
michael louwe
Level 10
Level 10
Posts: 3300
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2016 11:18 pm

Re: Load persistant Mint to SSD

Post by michael louwe » Thu May 03, 2018 5:18 am

@ journeyman3000, .......
journeyman3000 wrote:.
.
For a Live LM external USB SSD with persistent storage, it is best to make a few large changes to the Live LM system, rather than many small changes, in order to reduce file fragmentation in the casper-rw folder = a not-too-slow Live system.
....... If you intend to use it on other computers, do not install any kernel updates and proprietary device drivers(eg Nvidia drivers).

Others prefer to do a full install of LM on external USB HDD/SSD = a faster LM system.

Post Reply

Return to “Newbie Questions”