Page 1 of 1

Timeshift in Mint 19

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 5:59 am
by erikjan
Yesterday I installed Mint XFCE 19, very nice. Before I could install the updates, I got the recommendation to execute Timeshift. During all the fourteen years that I am using Linux I never needed to restore an older version. I reinstalled new versions, but never needed to repair a system. Linux is stable and does not corrupt itself. I fully understand why such a program is needed for Windows: Windows corrupts itself and must be refreshed periodically. Is Linux Mint unstable? Is it unable to keep up its own trousers? If so, one should not use such a distribution!

Second question: I must decide which "snapshot level" to use, but I cannot find what a snapshot level is.

This version is beautiful, but the inclusion of Timeshift makes me doubt whether it is stable enough to use it or not.

Greetings,

Erik Jan.

Re: Timeshift in Mint 19

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 6:12 am
by catweazel
erikjan wrote:
Wed Oct 24, 2018 5:59 am
This version is beautiful, but the inclusion of Timeshift makes me doubt whether it is stable enough to use it or not.
So turn it off. I don't use it and never will.

Re: Timeshift in Mint 19

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 6:23 am
by Pierre
you don't have to un-install / remove T.S. as such:
- just un-check all of it's options, that are used to customise it's various back-ups.
then, just leave it in place .. ..
8)

Re: Timeshift in Mint 19

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 10:36 am
by erikjan
thank you for your answers. I am glad to hear that it is an unneeded program. But I am still curious to lear what a "snapshot Level" is.

Thank you for your speedy answers.

Erik

Re: Timeshift in Mint 19

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 12:52 pm
by michael louwe
erikjan wrote:.
.
If you disable Timeshift in LM 19, you should also refer to ... https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/20 - Update Manager: understand and optimize it

Re: Timeshift in Mint 19

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 5:20 pm
by Neil Darlow
The inclusion of Timeshift by default in LM19 is a mitigation for any possible problems caused by its more permissive update policy. In earlier versions certain updates were held-back and could be installed at the user's discretion. Now, they are installed unilaterally and providing a means of rolling-back in the event that something goes wrong with an update is a good idea. Linux Mint is targeted at users migrating from Windows and they won't be versed in Linux recovery measures.