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how to install .exe file on linux systems?

Posted: Tue Dec 11, 2018 4:40 am
by clintonjmolina
how to install .exe file on linux systems?

Re: install

Posted: Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:20 am
by frosh
Hey,

.exe files only work under Windows. If you want to install software on Linux, you can do it using apt-get in the terminal or via Synaptic. If you want to install software that is not in the official repos, you can add a repository or download .deb files (for Linux Mint). If there is something you absolutely need that only runs on WIndows, you can try installing the .exe file through Wine. It's not really recommended though, and honestly these days there is almost no software for which you won't find a worthy alternative that does run on Linux.

I recommend you read this: How to install software on LInux Mint

Re: how to install .exe file on linux systems?

Posted: Tue Dec 11, 2018 11:02 am
by karlchen
clintonjmolina wrote:
Tue Dec 11, 2018 4:40 am
how to install .exe file on linux systems?
Brief question, asked a million times before and answered a millions times before. Hence, another brief answer:
How to run exe file in Ubuntu [duplicate]
How can I install Windows software or games?

Re: how to install .exe file on linux systems?

Posted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 1:16 am
by jimallyn
Welcome aboard, clintonjmolina! Mint doesn't ordinarily use .exe files, but it is possible to run some of them with a compatibility layer called Wine. There is a program called PlayOnLinux that can help you install Wine, and have more than one version of it installed at the same time. But you're usually best off using programs that are native to Linux. Just about any application you used in Windows, there is an equivalent program for Linux. As already mentioned, most of us try to avoid using Wine, because it opens up the possibility of infecting your system with a Windows virus, which ordinarily wouldn't run in Linux. Mint has a Software Manager with zillions of programs available for free, and easily installed. Have a look at that, you may find what you are looking for. The programs will not have the names you are used to in Windows, so think of it in terms of function: what does this program do? - as opposed to name: what is this program called? Some of the programs you may have already been using in Windows: Firefox, Chrome, Libre Office or Open Office, and a bunch more. Don't be afraid to ask more questions here, that's what the forums are here for.