Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

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absque fenestris
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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by absque fenestris » Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:30 pm

According to this we get a resolution of only about 2300 dpi - that's just 40% of the claimed resolution! The sensor of the V750 is able to get the indicated 6400 pixels per inch, however the "High Pass Optics" system of the scanner does not nearly reach the required quality required for capturing with the full resolution.
Scanning with more than 2400 dpi makes no sense on this Epson. This only gives bloated data and also takes a lot of time...

Here is the test: https://www.filmscanner.info/en/EpsonPe ... 50Pro.html
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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by pepperminty » Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:45 pm

Gratias tibi, absque fenestris.

I'll take note that 2300 DPI is the max I should go.

Oh, we have access to Epson v800, about 30 minutes farther away. Is the v800 better (faster scans, better-quality scans), to make it worth the added time to get to it?

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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by absque fenestris » Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:51 pm

pepperminty wrote:
Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:45 pm
Gratias tibi, absque fenestris.

I'll take note that 2300 DPI is the max I should go.

Oh, we have access to Epson v800, about 30 minutes farther away. Is the v800 better (faster scans, better-quality scans), to make it worth the added time to get to it?
Your welcome. It's generally recommended to use "even" values - e.g. 300 dpi, 600 dpi, 1200 dpi or the maximum of 2400 dpi for this device.

By the way, Epson is not alone. The fewest scanners reach the data that the marketing likes... :mrgreen:

I think the 800 is also on the test page.
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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by pepperminty » Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:54 pm

absque fenestris wrote:
Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:51 pm
pepperminty wrote:
Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:45 pm
Oh, we have access to Epson v800, about 30 minutes farther away. Is the v800 better (faster scans, better-quality scans), to make it worth the added time to get to it?
It's generally recommended to use "even" values - e.g. 300 dpi, 600 dpi, 1200 dpi or the maximum of 2400 dpi for this device.

By the way, Epson is not alone. The fewest scanners reach the data that the marketing likes... :mrgreen:
When you say "even values", do you mean multiples of 100?
350 dpi won't be "even value", would it? What makes these "even values" recommended?

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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by absque fenestris » Fri Aug 23, 2019 1:04 pm

300 dpi is a matrix of 300 x 300 dots, corresponding to 600 x 600 dots, etc. These matrices should be easily divisible - even the image processing software appreciates this.
Photoshop, for example, also displays intermediate values worse: good are 25%, 50%, 100% and the other hundreds of steps. GIMP should behave similarly. But attention: to judge the image quality all smoothing mechanisms have to be switched off.

To describe a funny exception: if you scan with 254 dpi, the pixels correspond to 1/10 millimeter... incredibly practical for people in the metric system. I do it privately for myself...
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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by pepperminty » Fri Aug 23, 2019 2:10 pm

absque fenestris,
If I understand you correctly, we should DPIs that are in multiples of 300? That is to say: 300, 600, 900, 1200, 1500?

Or is it just these 4 values: 300, 600 (which is 300x2), 1200 (which is 600x2), 2400 (which is 1200x2)?

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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by absque fenestris » Fri Aug 23, 2019 2:20 pm

The steps in hundreds are already okay. If you give data for the offset printing, the companies like my resolutions mentioned above.

300 dpi are for good quality images.
600 dpi or 1200 dpi are used for fine or extremely fine line graphics.
2400 dpi and above are actually only used for positive or negative film material in 35mm and medium format.
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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by pepperminty » Fri Aug 23, 2019 3:39 pm

I'm sorry I don't quite understand everything you wrote about matrices. Hope you don't mind my simply asking: Would choosing 350DPI be worse than going with the lower 300DPI?
absque fenestris wrote:
Fri Aug 23, 2019 2:20 pm
The steps in hundreds are already okay. If you give data for the offset printing, the companies like my resolutions mentioned above.

300 dpi are for good quality images.
600 dpi or 1200 dpi are used for fine or extremely fine line graphics.
2400 dpi and above are actually only used for positive or negative film material in 35mm and medium format.
When you say line graphics, you don't mean photographs, right? You're talking about something like postage stamps or currency?
I guess what I really wanna know is: Is 600 DPI for my pics something I should use?

flemur, lsemmens, polarvertex all recommend a resolution higher than 350.

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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by gittiest personITW » Fri Aug 23, 2019 4:37 pm

Hi again,
I scanned these old family photos that I keep going on about @600x600 ( on a scanner that could 'interpolate' to 2400 x 2400 )
The largest file was a TIFF about 50MB (A5 size) at 600x600dpi.
The 100% (minimally compressed) jpg@50x50dpi was 3MB. Both were done through the scanner and scanner software so the sizes probably aren't representative of what you would get on yours. This was some time ago.
On screen they look exactly the same.
If I was to print them up at the original size, there would be a difference but not as much as you think.

Anyway, storage on spinnies is cheap so its not a problem - and if it does ever become a problem can reduce the TIFFs at my leisure using most piccie software.

600x600 should be sufficient. But, whatever, if your original photo is for instance 10cm x 10cm, no matter what you scan it at, if you try to print it much bigger, you'll get a pixelated picture.
All you can do is preserve what you have - not really improve it. (Unless using Gimp/PShop etc and even that is limited unless you are really anal about pixels)

If you try scanning at 600x600 and at 1200x1200 - the same picture, then zoom in and see if there is a difference.
If not, then scan at 600x600.
Also - scan 1 at a time. Saves time in the long run.

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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by absque fenestris » Fri Aug 23, 2019 5:42 pm

300 to 350 dpi is practically no difference in resolution - but 300 is easier to calculate.

Line graphics are pencil and ink drawings, final drawings, construction plans with inscriptions, tables and then also prints such as wood and copper cuts and etchings.

With 600 dpi you have your photos in any case to more than 100% securely archived (...and 2 times enlarged in length and width ).
Whether the four times larger data stock - and also the greater expenditure of time - compared to 300 dpi is worthwhile, you have to try it out on the screen and with the printer.
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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by JerryF » Fri Aug 23, 2019 6:01 pm

Since your major reason is to distribute to family and not print, then you really don't need large resolutions such as 4800 dpi, etc.

You also mentioned:
...It makes it easy to share these pics spanning generations with family. Also, Mom is interested in getting a digital photo frame (I may get her one as a gift :) ). I asked her how large she wants the digital photo frame, and she pointed to the monitor we were using, which looked like a 24-inch flat-screen monitor.
...
For a digital frame, if the photos are scanned at a too-high resolution, you won't be able to load too many photos into the frame. Also, each photo will take longer to display, sometimes 30 seconds or more. 30 seconds doesn't sound like a long time, but it is when waiting for photo to load.

My advise is to scan at 2400 dpi for archives. Then create a copy the photos by converting them to a lower resolution to share with others. Most programs can do that as a batch in practically no time at all.
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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by pepperminty » Fri Aug 23, 2019 7:11 pm

Thanks, JerryF.
I have no plans to print, but when I share the pics with family, they may ask for a higher-res picture. I'd like to have high-res just in case.
Thanks for the tip on photo frames and delayed loading with too-high-res pics.

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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by TI58C » Sat Aug 24, 2019 3:27 am

OK, so you scan at a relatively high resolution for your own archive (possibly scanning negatives). That makes total sense.

Read you might want to distribute pics on a digital photo frame. In that case, you might want to convert those high-quality TIFF pics to jpg and give package "aaphoto" a try. I have found that quite often it really improves how a photo looks.

From the description:
[DESCRIPTION]
Auto Adjust Photo is a tiny command-line image manipulation tool for automatic color correction of photos. It tries to make the picture look better. The program does this by analyzing the input image and then sets the most optimal contrast, gamma, color balance and saturation for it.
It is suitable for converting a large number of pics in just one go.
Will not accept tiff as input though.

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Re: Gonna scan photos from the 80s and 90s. Which file format from this list should we use?

Post by JerryF » Sun Aug 25, 2019 5:03 pm

I just came across this and thought of you and your post. Hope this helps.

https://www.scanyourentirelife.com/dpi- ... otographs/
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