Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

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Vic20
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Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:17 am

I build, design, configure and fly remote control aircraft. When I got involved with the forums upon it, it was a nightmare trying to figure out what people were talking about since so very much was assumed for the person new to the hobby.... Linux is no different, and filtering through the support threads with people facing the same problems as I turned into one hell of a struggle to get up to speed as to what they were saying. Both tended to jump forward, skipping the very beginning steps in order to get at the meat and potatoes for the solutions, and one goes off on rabbit trails forever hoping by chance they get something they can actually use to fix/help what they are needing with.

Terminal commands, it's rather neglected too often along "where" to place them, as in you have to navigate into the proper folder before the commands will do anything, and the "where" spot has you going through more rabbit trails, guessing you have the correct paths. Tossing that thinking, navigating in the windows/file manager to the actual spot you are needing to adjust, right click on an open area and select "open in terminal" and you are at the correct path, now some of those commands may actually work. There are a lot of things that can get screwed up using the terminal and back tracking is pretty much impossible to undo, using the GUI's for adjustments are much easier to contend with, and most people like myself aren't all that interested in having to input lines of code and commands in some terminal, we just want to use our computers as we have been in windows.

The software manager has an odd cache, I found the nightmare with Wine, where it's default install on the box I am writing from worked flawlessly from the install of the OS, not my second one at all. Apparently if you uninstall a program you need to reboot your computer else it still has it running in the background. I also had the series of errors, freezes, hangs, on the software manager on the other box, tearing through everything out there, nothing would fix it, and I ended up doing a new clean install of the entire OS rather then being stuck in terminal land forever with nothing working. This leads to the base install, and how to do it with the least amount of bugs and issues which is next and why stuff was not working correctly to begin with and likely the root to very many other peoples problems.

You want to run the ISO, ie. boot cd/removable media to a full desktop environment, then connect to the internet, then install it on to your hard drive from there using it's install option you will see as a desktop icon. It has problems just auto connecting to the web during an install from the media upon boot only. Also, booting to the media first lets you see if there are going to be any problems with your hardware and if you are not sure, let it run for a day or so and make sure to push it's capacity, ie. use the office software, graphics, watch video, etc. to see if you get the frozen screen of death. My first box I got turned onto Linux Mint was an emachine, it sure looked like it was going to work, but didn't take long before the frozen screen happened, and even upgrading it's video card, still it's a lost cause of a system for conversion, but it will fool you into thinking it's viable. Don't get disappointed, there was a reason MS abandoned support for those systems, they were designed to be disposable to force people to upgrade entire systems a year or two later.

Something to keep in mind too, unlike windows, there are going to be lots of time where you think the system is not updating/installing/etc. quickly enough, and that it's hanging. Don't get impatient, this isn't windows that seems to tend to do those things more quickly, its more like they don't keep you entertained with animated graphics that stay animated to assure you that it's still doing it's thing.

I can tell you though, even though it may be a bit more rough getting things properly set up, there are far more things you can customize and do on linux then windows remotely lets you. Most of the same things you are used to are there, they just have different names or in a different spot. I haven't powered up my windows computer in weeks and can only see me doing so to get the files from it transferred onto my other systems, afterwards putting it in the closet or simply tossing it. I used the crap out of it, it's literally physically falling apart, which is what prompted me to get proactive and get another box or two to continue operations upon with, and I am just glad I get to keep my must have windows software along with the new suite of linux based ones, so I'm not going to miss anything.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by carum carvi » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:20 pm

Welcome to the LinuxMint forum and thanks for sharing your experience Vic20.

Starting with a new computer operating system is challenging. You did it any way. I applaud your effort to pull through. :) Once you have taken the first hurdles though, you will find that especially LinuxMInt is a very user friendly experience.

You can always keep Windows as a backup OS for situations in which an application isnt working smoothly in LinuxMint. Many users started using Linux by dual booting with Windows. I have done so for 2 years as well before I started using LinuxMint and nothing else.

Hope you enjoy your stay on this forum, where everybody is trying to help others the best they can.
Greetings Carum Carvi.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Moem » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:30 pm

Vic20 wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:17 am
most people like myself aren't all that interested in having to input lines of code and commands in some terminal, we just want to use our computers as we have been in windows.
I can sympathise, I'm not a terminal hero myself. And on Mint, you don't have to be, unless you want to.
But keep the following in mind:
when you ask people for help and they are trying to give you a good answer, it's way easier for them to say 'please paste this into the terminal' than to figure out where to find everything in your specific version of Mint, and then to guide you through a maze of menus and buttons that they cannot see.
That is why you will see helpers here on the forum often provide terminal commands. It doesn't mean that you as a user will need to learn them. It's just a faster way to provide support.

Then again, there are plenty of people who enjoy working in a command line interface, on Windows as well as on Linux. It's not just a Linux thing. It's the preferred tool of many computer users. I'm just not one of them. :wink:
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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:06 am

carum carvi wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:20 pm
Welcome to the LinuxMint forum and thanks for sharing your experience Vic20.

Starting with a new computer operating system is challenging. You did it any way. I applaud your effort to pull through. :) Once you have taken the first hurdles though, you will find that especially LinuxMInt is a very user friendly experience.

You can always keep Windows as a backup OS for situations in which an application isnt working smoothly in LinuxMint. Many users started using Linux by dual booting with Windows. I have done so for 2 years as well before I started using LinuxMint and nothing else.

Hope you enjoy your stay on this forum, where everybody is trying to help others the best they can.
Greetings Carum Carvi.
Thank you, this is really is worth the hassle on the other box, it really wasn't much to do on this one; tremendous amount of good people writing drivers and such just because it's the right thing to do, not to charge you for it. I very much look forward to digging deeper into this, and being of help if necessary to others if I can.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:13 am

Moem wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:30 pm
Vic20 wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:17 am
most people like myself aren't all that interested in having to input lines of code and commands in some terminal, we just want to use our computers as we have been in windows.
I can sympathise, I'm not a terminal hero myself. And on Mint, you don't have to be, unless you want to.
But keep the following in mind:
when you ask people for help and they are trying to give you a good answer, it's way easier for them to say 'please paste this into the terminal' than to figure out where to find everything in your specific version of Mint, and then to guide you through a maze of menus and buttons that they cannot see.
That is why you will see helpers here on the forum often provide terminal commands. It doesn't mean that you as a user will need to learn them. It's just a faster way to provide support.

Then again, there are plenty of people who enjoy working in a command line interface, on Windows as well as on Linux. It's not just a Linux thing. It's the preferred tool of many computer users. I'm just not one of them. :wink:
I think one should just sit back and be in a zen type of mode, not expecting it all to go together as before, even needing to take a few active steps for install, a bit more for customizing, but it's a hard sale when you are talking to people who just look down and press an icon to do the rest. I love having an actual interface that actually does something, not this dos can't do anything to adjust the OS, so I am not anti terminal, just most people are and trying to keep my noob mindset upon in tact, since there will be many people I will urge to try out linux or migrate over to it now and into the future. I've dabbled with it prior, now seeing the landscape of things, it's time to be more mainstream on open source OS, open source everything software wise, that is what it used to be, I miss those days.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:27 am

I never put in too much thought into naming my computers, I named these and it meant something for some reason. First box, here, name is Enterprise, the second, Voyager. Old Star Trek, they flew by the seat of their pants, wits and actions got them through, this seems appropriate.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:40 pm

Yesterday I took a visit to my relatives place, they own an electronics recycle center and have ton's of computers dropped off regularly along with a massive amount of really good hardware. To me, it's very much a kid in a candy store. I started out thinking of just seeing if they had a large monitor and perhaps a sound card and just leaving it at that....sure, just that and leave, right....

They did not have any monitors that were of any larger size then the ones I currently have, but they had a nice sound card, well, that and God's gift to a motherboard X79-Deluxe, fully loaded up with 64 gigs ddr 3 of ram, not sure what processor is in it, but will check those specs once I install it all, in addition, a WD black, 2 Terabyte hard drive, and they threw in a really nice tower to put it in, well, that tower was already loaded up with a nice gaming motherboard, 8 gigs of ram as well on top of a 1 gig Asus graphics card. I opted to fire up the tower using the 320 gig hard drive I was using on the emachine which found out the machine is a lost cause unless I want to go to Vista with it, it's last attempt was running Lubuntu. I just to see if it would at least load up Bios so just booted it up to see what would happen.... To my surprise, the thing booted up to the OS perfectly, it also was able to install the proprietary driver for the video card as well.

I am just floored, we are talking about two completely different systems, one from the stone age, this new one, just a couple of years old, and same hard drive, same OS, nothing needing to be redone, working flawlessly. Good luck trying that with Windows. Now I need to decide if I want to get another tower for the new motherboard or stuff what is in the current tower into the emachine tower and get the new system onto the box as originally planned. The new set up will be going with 64 bit Mint OS, and it will be my video and music production box. I play guitar and trumpet at pro level, also do vocals and some keys, it's pretty painful to record on the old system, an old Dell with 1 gig of ram and 80 gig hard drive laptop, this is going to be so nice.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by decrepit » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:15 am

Now you've made more than half of us jealous! Relies with an electronic recycle store, wow.
Sounds like you're going to have fun.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:36 am

decrepit wrote:
Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:15 am
Now you've made more than half of us jealous! Relies with an electronic recycle store, wow.
Sounds like you're going to have fun.
Grinning ear to ear, the best of the best, super expensive and high end, just on the super dirt cheap here. I am in hardware heaven at this stage. lol. :)

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:45 am

Also, being able to bring back these older systems for use, they still have lot's of life and use to them.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by majpooper » Sun Oct 13, 2019 11:29 am

Vic20 wrote:
Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:36 am
decrepit wrote:
Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:15 am
Now you've made more than half of us jealous! Relies with an electronic recycle store, wow.
Sounds like you're going to have fun.
Grinning ear to ear, the best of the best, super expensive and high end, just on the super dirt cheap here. I am in hardware heaven at this stage. lol. :)
I am amazed what folks throw away. About a year ago a doctor in my family decided to ditch his iMac Pro for a Mac Powerbook - it was the biggest laptop I had ever seen. He felt the desktop was to slow and had been infected with a virus - I have no idea as he or someone wiped the hard drive. His wife gave it to my wife with the message if I didn't want it just recycle it. I loaded LM 18.3 Cinnamon on it and it ran beautifully. I gave to a family who had a girl in Middle School who could not afford a computer for her - she was thrilled. Also a few years ago someone gave me an HP PC that I swear must have been 12 to 15 years old - the monitor was huge and it sat on top of the PC. I actually got lubuntu and puppy linux to run on it but in the end recycled it. I did the same thing with an old Mac Mini. It seems you can get linux to run on anything - literally.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Mon Oct 14, 2019 3:59 am

It's forgiving as well, writing to you from the new box, motherboard and video card are not the best to contend with combo wise, but I can assure you people have no idea what it's worth too often. Did we just lose our minds or what? I think the cell phone world has done a disservice to desktop and other real computers industry wise, and less and less boxes will be tossed away since they won't be made in such volume any more what so ever. It's a shame, you can use a computer for far more then just surfing the internet and playing games, sadly that is what most people are doing with them.

New box, has some issues, such as getting it to see the full 64 gigs of ram rather then just 16, I have to go into and exit the bios to boot it since it's stating the processor fan is not working even though it does, but it's so far light years ahead of what I've been using just a few months ago exclusively.

It would be cool if there was some way to get these old systems out to people that can use them rather then recycle them, but I am not complaining being able to get to pick from the lot.

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Thu Oct 17, 2019 2:06 am

After having getting the workhorse software that I have been using, I was reluctant to share tasks between computers, and it looks like I do not have to. Wine is running the 32 bit software quite well even though I am running 64 bit Mint. This is just too cool. Noobs, do not let the conversion stop you,. Most at oldest are running "windows" 32 bit software. I spent far too much time upon this, it's a shortcut or bit more upon burn the cd and try it out and the rest for making it your main os. I am windows free, fully and not looking back even more so. :)

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Re: Sharing my experiences so far, and some advice for the transition from windows to Linux

Post by Vic20 » Fri Oct 25, 2019 5:46 am

I built a frankenbox from old and new system components. It was a fun tangent, and it's going to be added onto as time permits. DO NOT THROW OUT that old gear, even towers from the early 2000's if was meant originally for some business class gear, still has lot's of capacity to strip down and bolt onto more current, heavy as it is, loving the extra space it provides. This is becoming more fun on the newer gear as well, and a mix match of pieces, coming together and doing stuff it's meant for, be it a bit out of place on the original time line it's intended, it's configured and added onto far beyond it's years and even current is held formidable. I am running all of my windows aps as stated before, date transfer from them, via. laptop to desktop, much, much better way to go using the linux OS rather then windows without even a remote degree of argument. I got my extensive amount of really, really good data, stuff my business and self that has relied upon and even forgotten about in full hassle free onto another hard drive, and working in full software wise as well in that old windows environment directly without any surgery or phd is computer science.
Linux Mint is the next OS for all users, it's not if, but when the rest of the population learns of this. This computer user, power user from 1983 first pc, this impressed, speaks volumes, this whole seeing the hodgepoge of the current chaos of the scene upon OS land, natural fit for the common person as well as the hard core. Linux Mint Needs It's Own Dedicated boxes if need be. I have zero need for any windows or apple computer, none of them have any capacity to do what I need to, and I can run their aps and programs if need be regardless, even though this box is not based upon either.

Chrome, Microsoft and Apple, move over, there is a hell of a lot better platform and OS to be taking over for the average and advanced computer user that the masses will love! It took some time to get used to, but I am a power user, most people are only doing light weight stuff at best. It's also that added security knowing my computer will not be hacked, hijacked or undermined, I can't say the same for apple and windows....

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