Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

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PCMan007
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Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by PCMan007 »

Okay, so last night I finally took the plunge, was able to get help with making the DVD, and am currently running Mint 19.3. I have previously run version 19 in a VM. So what exactly can I do here? Surprisingly enough my internet and sound works, and I didn't have to install any drivers. What about my other mobo drivers? Would those need installed if this was an actual Linux installation? Forgive me right now, but I'm super excited about this!! I've posted my inxi at the end of this post.

Also, I got help regarding hard drive assignments. sdb2 is my C:\, sdc2 is my E:\ but I also recognized them because I used labels to identify the drives. Computer is C:\, Games is E:\ etc. Youtube ran perfectly fine, what about viruses and malware, should I still run Avast and Malwarebytes like I have been with Windows?

I noticed a drive that just says File System, and I noticed all of my physical hard drives because they are all Western Digital so they show up as WDC. But aside from the sdb and sdc, the File System is labeled as /. Is that the DVD-ROM drive? It's telling me it has 16.7 gb free, but I can't install anything to it right? I used a DVD-R since that's all I had. Can I install anything at this point or not? I want to see what kinds of games I could run mainly.

Oh my other question. I run 2 monitors. In Windows my left monitor is main, the monitor on the right isn't my main monitor. In Windows all I have to do is drag the mouse from the left screen to the right, but in Linux I have to drag the mouse to the left to get it to show up on the right screen. Are there options that let me change that? I was going through the options for it last night, but saw no option for that part specifically. I got my icons and taskbar on the left hand screen perfectly fine. Thanks for the help :) Only thing I'm wondering about now is virus protection and mobo driver installation. At this point, I don't care. I can easily get rid of Windows as it's all on the C:\ drive, I just wonder about on a scale of 1 to 10, how easy is it to install programs and my GPU drivers? I've done Wine before, but it was a lot of hoops for getting it right. All my games are on E:\, music is on F:\ and all my pictures and movies are on G:\. Thanks again :D :D :D

OH and also, here is my inxi posted below....

Code: Select all

System:    Host: mint Kernel: 5.0.0-32-generic x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc v: 7.4.0 
           Desktop: Cinnamon 4.4.5 wm: muffin dm: LightDM Distro: Linux Mint 19.3 Tricia 
           base: Ubuntu 18.04 bionic 
Machine:   Type: Desktop Mobo: ASUSTeK model: M5A78L-M/USB3 v: Rev X.0x serial: <filter> 
           BIOS: American Megatrends v: 2001 date: 09/11/2014 
CPU:       Topology: 8-Core model: AMD FX-8300 bits: 64 type: MCP arch: Bulldozer 
           L2 cache: 2048 KiB 
           flags: lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 sse4a ssse3 svm bogomips: 53036 
           Speed: 1406 MHz min/max: 1400/3300 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 1405 2: 1396 3: 1407 
           4: 1408 5: 1405 6: 1405 7: 1405 8: 1406 
Graphics:  Device-1: NVIDIA GM204 [GeForce GTX 970] driver: nouveau v: kernel bus ID: 01:00.0 
           chip ID: 10de:13c2 
           Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.20.4 driver: modesetting unloaded: fbdev,vesa 
           resolution: 1920x1080~60Hz, 1920x1080~60Hz 
           OpenGL: renderer: NV124 v: 4.3 Mesa 19.0.8 direct render: Yes 
Audio:     Device-1: AMD SBx00 Azalia vendor: ASUSTeK M4A785TD driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel 
           bus ID: 00:14.2 chip ID: 1002:4383 
           Device-2: NVIDIA GM204 High Definition Audio driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel 
           bus ID: 01:00.1 chip ID: 10de:0fbb 
           Device-3: Logitech Webcam C310 type: USB driver: snd-usb-audio,uvcvideo bus ID: 8-1:2 
           chip ID: 046d:081b 
           Sound Server: ALSA v: k5.0.0-32-generic 
Network:   Device-1: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet 
           vendor: ASUSTeK P8P67 and other motherboards driver: r8169 v: kernel port: e800 
           bus ID: 03:00.0 chip ID: 10ec:8168 
           IF: enp3s0 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter> 
Drives:    Local Storage: total: 3.64 TiB used: 163.3 MiB (0.0%) 
           ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Western Digital model: WD20EZRX-00D8PB0 size: 1.82 TiB 
           speed: <unknown> serial: <filter> temp: 32 C 
           ID-2: /dev/sdb vendor: Western Digital model: WD5000AZLX-00CL5A0 size: 465.76 GiB 
           speed: 3.0 Gb/s serial: <filter> temp: 33 C 
           ID-3: /dev/sdc vendor: Western Digital model: WD10EZEX-75M2NA0 size: 931.51 GiB 
           speed: 3.0 Gb/s serial: <filter> temp: 33 C 
           ID-4: /dev/sdd vendor: Western Digital model: WD5000AAKX-001CA0 size: 465.76 GiB 
           speed: 3.0 Gb/s serial: <filter> temp: 35 C 
Partition: ID-1: / size: 15.70 GiB used: 163.3 MiB (1.0%) fs: overlay source: ERR-102 
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 23.9 C mobo: N/A gpu: nouveau temp: 42 C 
           Fan Speeds (RPM): N/A gpu: nouveau fan: 1102 
Repos:     Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list 
           1: deb cdrom:[Linux Mint 19.3 _Tricia_ - Release amd64 20191213]/ bionic contrib main non-free
           Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list 
           1: deb http: //packages.linuxmint.com tricia main upstream import backport #id:linuxmint_main
           2: deb http: //archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic main restricted universe multiverse
           3: deb http: //archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic-updates main restricted universe multiverse
           4: deb http: //archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic-backports main restricted universe multiverse
           5: deb http: //security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ bionic-security main restricted universe multiverse
           6: deb http: //archive.canonical.com/ubuntu/ bionic partner
Info:      Processes: 216 Uptime: 20m Memory: 31.39 GiB used: 1.10 GiB (3.5%) Init: systemd v: 237 
           runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 7.4.0 alt: 7 Client: Unknown python3.6 client inxi: 3.0.32
iain_33
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by iain_33 »

Hello PCMan007

Most of the drivers in Linux are built into the kernel so you won't need to install any mobo drivers - once you've installed, check the Driver Manager and that'll show you any additional ones you may need (likely for your graphics card).

Antivirus you won't need - Linux is inherently more secure than Windows, and given its smaller user base, less of a target anyway. As long as you stick to installing software from the software manager and following the usual precautions of not opening untrusted email attachments etc, you'll be fine.

Re. the file system - whereas on Windows all drives / partitions have their own letter (C:, D:, E: etc) which each have their own file system starting from that drive letter, on Linux there's one file system, starting at / (referred to as the root), which is located on the partition you install Linux on, then all other drives/partitions are mounted (attached) to a folder within that file system, so you could have your music partiton mounted at eg. /home/yourname/music.

From my experience, installing programs (from the software manager) and the GPU driver (from the driver manager), was 10 on the scale of easy :D
Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon on Lenovo Legion Y540 laptop (2020)
Linux Mint 19.3 Mate on HP G70 laptop (2009)
ralplpcr
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by ralplpcr »

Excellent! Glad you were able to get it up & running!

In all likelihood, you won't need to install your motherboard drivers. You are currently running the "default" Nouveau driver for your GeForce card - - this will provide adequate performance, but you'd need to install the "real" proprietary NVidia driver if you want the full graphics performance from that card. It will require an actual install to HDD before you can run Driver Manager to install that.

You also probably won't need antivirus. Linux viruses are extremely rare, and the file system is built in such a way that it automatically protects against them by default. Just don't go randomly clicking on strange links & downloaded files that aren't from a trusted source, and you'll be fine!

The "/" is your "root" device. Linux utilizes a different methodology to manage your disks than Windows does. Instead of assigning drive letters "C:\", "D:\", etc, everything is mounted under "root" - - or "/". There are several folders located in "/", the primary one you'll need to worry about is "/home". This is where your Desktop, Documents, Downloads, and the majority of your user account's settings will be stored. When you have multiple disks, they can also be mounted under "/" - - this usually happens under "/dev/sda", "/dev/sdb", etc, with each partition on that drive receiving a number - "/dev/sda1", "/dev/sda2", etc.

You can temporarily install *some* programs, but you'll be limited. When running from a live session (USB or DVD), everything is basically running in memory from a virtual drive. Anything requiring a reboot (such as installing graphics drivers) will be lost upon rebooting. You're also limited by the amount of available memory in your virtual drive. Think of this as a "trial run" to determine if you like Mint enough to actually install. You can certainly do a bunch more with an actual installed Mint - - this is just getting your feet a little wet.

To reposition how your monitors are set, open your Cinnamon menu (press the Windows key) and type display. This should locate the Display applet in your menu. You can then click it to launch. Once it's up, simply drag & reposition the monitors however you'd like. You can also set which monitor you want as primary simply by clicking that monitor in the display applet, and clicking the "Set as Primary" button.

Mint has many programs built-in to handle most media, such as pictures, music, & movies. There are also tons more in the software manager - - I'd recommend checking them out before trying to install Windows programs under Wine. You may just find you like them better! As far as installing programs goes, it's pretty easy - - the software manager allows you to lookup a program & install it with basically one-click. You can also uninstall the same way. If there's a program you want to install that's NOT in the software manager, you'd likely want to use a .DEB file to install. This is basically like an .EXE or .MSI in Windows - - it's a pre-packaged solution that contains all the installation instructions & dependencies in a self-extracting package. For example, if you wanted to install Google Chrome, you'd download the .DEB & double-click. You'd be asked for your password.... and that's it. The .DEB file will automatically extract & install with a minimum of fuss. Just ask here if there's any particular program you're trying to find - - I'm sure you'll get plenty of suggestions & instructions!
PCMan007
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by PCMan007 »

ralplpcr wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:02 am
Excellent! Glad you were able to get it up & running!

In all likelihood, you won't need to install your motherboard drivers. You are currently running the "default" Nouveau driver for your GeForce card - - this will provide adequate performance, but you'd need to install the "real" proprietary NVidia driver if you want the full graphics performance from that card. It will require an actual install to HDD before you can run Driver Manager to install that.

You also probably won't need antivirus. Linux viruses are extremely rare, and the file system is built in such a way that it automatically protects against them by default. Just don't go randomly clicking on strange links & downloaded files that aren't from a trusted source, and you'll be fine!

The "/" is your "root" device. Linux utilizes a different methodology to manage your disks than Windows does. Instead of assigning drive letters "C:\", "D:\", etc, everything is mounted under "root" - - or "/". There are several folders located in "/", the primary one you'll need to worry about is "/home". This is where your Desktop, Documents, Downloads, and the majority of your user account's settings will be stored. When you have multiple disks, they can also be mounted under "/" - - this usually happens under "/dev/sda", "/dev/sdb", etc, with each partition on that drive receiving a number - "/dev/sda1", "/dev/sda2", etc.

You can temporarily install *some* programs, but you'll be limited. When running from a live session (USB or DVD), everything is basically running in memory from a virtual drive. Anything requiring a reboot (such as installing graphics drivers) will be lost upon rebooting. You're also limited by the amount of available memory in your virtual drive. Think of this as a "trial run" to determine if you like Mint enough to actually install. You can certainly do a bunch more with an actual installed Mint - - this is just getting your feet a little wet.

To reposition how your monitors are set, open your Cinnamon menu (press the Windows key) and type display. This should locate the Display applet in your menu. You can then click it to launch. Once it's up, simply drag & reposition the monitors however you'd like. You can also set which monitor you want as primary simply by clicking that monitor in the display applet, and clicking the "Set as Primary" button.

Mint has many programs built-in to handle most media, such as pictures, music, & movies. There are also tons more in the software manager - - I'd recommend checking them out before trying to install Windows programs under Wine. You may just find you like them better! As far as installing programs goes, it's pretty easy - - the software manager allows you to lookup a program & install it with basically one-click. You can also uninstall the same way. If there's a program you want to install that's NOT in the software manager, you'd likely want to use a .DEB file to install. This is basically like an .EXE or .MSI in Windows - - it's a pre-packaged solution that contains all the installation instructions & dependencies in a self-extracting package. For example, if you wanted to install Google Chrome, you'd download the .DEB & double-click. You'd be asked for your password.... and that's it. The .DEB file will automatically extract & install with a minimum of fuss. Just ask here if there's any particular program you're trying to find - - I'm sure you'll get plenty of suggestions & instructions!
SWEET!! I got the monitors the way they should be (sigh) awesome! I feel better now. Thanks for your help again :) Well, that's usually my problem is some websites out there have scripts that try to take over your machine, or try to install things without your knowledge. And in Windows all it takes is one script and you're done. So I'm literally running Avast anti-virus and Malwarebytes Premium for the real time shield protection.

Yea mainly for me, it's GPU drivers, Skype and steam games, then DOSBOX, my dos games, all my old stuff, windows 3.1 (back when microsoft cared), if I can get all of that up and running on Linux, screw windows at that point.

Then it's just a matter of slowly going through all my windows games to see if they'll work with Linux. Like Casino Empire by Hoyle. It was made back in 2002 by Sierra Entertainment, not the original Sierra with Ken Williams. I have PBA Bowling 2001 made by Bethesda and in the VM that game was working with Wine, but omg it was torture. It was so bad that I couldn't even get past the second menu. But it worked. So I'd like to think all the older stuff would work, including all of my dos games since that is in DOSBOX.
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by AndyMH »

Think most of your questions have been answered. Linux will read/write windows partitions (ntfs, fat32) but not the other way round - windows does not recognise linux partitions, e.g. ext4. Occasionally, some users have problems writing to a windows partition. A common problem is windows not shutting down - turn off fast boot in win10.

Linux will mount your other drives/partitions in /media/you. If you have used labels, the mount point will be /media/you/mylabel, if you didn't use a label, it will use the UUID of the partition (a long incomprehensible number), e.g. /media/you/f049c973-29d4-4c2d-8b4f-82ce86b81c29, which is why it is a good idea to use labels! You can mount your other partitions wherever you want, e.g. your games on E: could mount as /home/you/games. This requires editing a file called fstab, bit more complicated, so get up and running and comfortable first. When you run the file manager in mint (they are different, depending on which version of mint you install, e.g. for cinnamon the file manager is nemo) it will list all the partitions on your other drives under 'devices' in the left panel in the file manager - just click on one to open it.

If you want help installing to your multi-drive setup, open up a terminal and run sudo parted -l (lowercase L). Post the output between code markers (the </> button above the reply window). It will tell us what drives/partitions you have.
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ralplpcr
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by ralplpcr »

PCMan007 wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:32 am
SWEET!! I got the monitors the way they should be (sigh) awesome! I feel better now. Thanks for your help again :) Well, that's usually my problem is some websites out there have scripts that try to take over your machine, or try to install things without your knowledge. And in Windows all it takes is one script and you're done. So I'm literally running Avast anti-virus and Malwarebytes Premium for the real time shield protection.
FYI - it's generally NOT recommended to run multiple anti-virus programs in Windows. They have a tendency to conflict with each other, and can end up making your installation LESS secure than if you ran just one. Of course, if you're running linux, that won't be such a problem....
PCMan007 wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:32 am
Yea mainly for me, it's GPU drivers, Skype and steam games, then DOSBOX, my dos games, all my old stuff, windows 3.1 (back when microsoft cared), if I can get all of that up and running on Linux, screw windows at that point.
GPU drivers shouldn't be a problem. You'll just need an actual installation to HDD before you can apply them. Skype & Steam both work pretty well in Linux - - there are a few Steam games that may not work in Linux, but the majority of them are usually reported to run *better* than under Windows. DOSBOX, dos games, & even Windows 3.1 itself all work wonderfully in linux. I've got a DOSBOX with a full Windows 3.1 installation in it for the occasional solitaire or original Quake game.
PCMan007 wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:32 am
Then it's just a matter of slowly going through all my windows games to see if they'll work with Linux. Like Casino Empire by Hoyle. It was made back in 2002 by Sierra Entertainment, not the original Sierra with Ken Williams. I have PBA Bowling 2001 made by Bethesda and in the VM that game was working with Wine, but omg it was torture. It was so bad that I couldn't even get past the second menu. But it worked. So I'd like to think all the older stuff would work, including all of my dos games since that is in DOSBOX.
Some Windows games will work under Wine, others may not. Wine can be a finicky thing, and is sometimes frustrating... but it can be useful at times. I'd recommend checking out Wine HQ Application Database for hints & instructions for installing many Windows games. It'll list known attempts to install under Wine, and provide a rating as to how well it'll work. For example, your Casino Empire has a platinum rating - - it should work perfectly?
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by PCMan007 »

ralplpcr wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:50 am
PCMan007 wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:32 am
SWEET!! I got the monitors the way they should be (sigh) awesome! I feel better now. Thanks for your help again :) Well, that's usually my problem is some websites out there have scripts that try to take over your machine, or try to install things without your knowledge. And in Windows all it takes is one script and you're done. So I'm literally running Avast anti-virus and Malwarebytes Premium for the real time shield protection.
FYI - it's generally NOT recommended to run multiple anti-virus programs in Windows. They have a tendency to conflict with each other, and can end up making your installation LESS secure than if you ran just one. Of course, if you're running linux, that won't be such a problem....
PCMan007 wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:32 am
Yea mainly for me, it's GPU drivers, Skype and steam games, then DOSBOX, my dos games, all my old stuff, windows 3.1 (back when microsoft cared), if I can get all of that up and running on Linux, screw windows at that point.
GPU drivers shouldn't be a problem. You'll just need an actual installation to HDD before you can apply them. Skype & Steam both work pretty well in Linux - - there are a few Steam games that may not work in Linux, but the majority of them are usually reported to run *better* than under Windows. DOSBOX, dos games, & even Windows 3.1 itself all work wonderfully in linux. I've got a DOSBOX with a full Windows 3.1 installation in it for the occasional solitaire or original Quake game.
PCMan007 wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:32 am
Then it's just a matter of slowly going through all my windows games to see if they'll work with Linux. Like Casino Empire by Hoyle. It was made back in 2002 by Sierra Entertainment, not the original Sierra with Ken Williams. I have PBA Bowling 2001 made by Bethesda and in the VM that game was working with Wine, but omg it was torture. It was so bad that I couldn't even get past the second menu. But it worked. So I'd like to think all the older stuff would work, including all of my dos games since that is in DOSBOX.
Some Windows games will work under Wine, others may not. Wine can be a finicky thing, and is sometimes frustrating... but it can be useful at times. I'd recommend checking out Wine HQ Application Database for hints & instructions for installing many Windows games. It'll list known attempts to install under Wine, and provide a rating as to how well it'll work. For example, your Casino Empire has a platinum rating - - it should work perfectly?
WOW!!! It is sooo damn tempting right now to install Linux. I hate ms so much. I think with me and Linux it's going to be a, 'learn as I go' method. OH I almost forgot to mention, so my 2 USB 3 ports at the front of the case, those seemed to work but I'm not sure. I plugged in a wired xbox 360 controller, the controller light came on, but I couldn't find any option in the control menu for adjusting controllers. Are they also supported in Linux?

Oh also, I do own the Sony, now Magix, Sound Forge 10, any idea if that works, Sony Vegas Movie Studio 13, and Bandicam also? I purchased all of those programs and would hate to lose them.

Well I just did a search on the link you provided, and well, looks like all 3 of those programs have huge issues running. I do a lot of screen recording with bandicam, and sometimes if I get an idea in my head I'll do sound editing/movie recording. That's a huge bummer :(

But it just comes down to those companies not wanting to code their stuff for Linux then? I know I read on a steam discussion this person was saying to port Fallout 4 for Linux, and that he wanted to run it but can't go back to s***win 10 or something like that. And then people were writing stuff like, no tux, no bux, and +1 for Linux, then a bunch of other people were saying how bethesda would never port the game. I dunno. I have it, but I have tons of other steam games, and I hardly play it anyway as it is, so I could do without it, but kind of need the bandicam and sound forge and movie studio. Well, at least I have the DVD now, if I ever need to do away with windows 7, I know I have something to come to as an OS for my system.
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by ralplpcr »

PCMan007 wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 9:36 am
Oh also, I do own the Sony, now Magix, Sound Forge 10, any idea if that works, Sony Vegas Movie Studio 13, and Bandicam also? I purchased all of those programs and would hate to lose them.
No idea? My guess is probably not - - those type programs often require pretty direct access to the hardware, which is very difficult to get in Wine.
Fortunately, Linux comes with many excellent replacement alternatives... and they're usually completely free! Check out Audacity (sound studio replacement), Kazam or Cheese(screen capture/web cam capture) and OpenShot or KDenLive (video editing).
Last edited by ralplpcr on Sun Jun 14, 2020 10:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by AndyMH »

For games, you will be dual booting for the foreseeable (outside of the oculus rift, I don't play games, so no expert), for everything else there is almost always a linux alternative to your favourite program, all you need to do is ask.
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by PCMan007 »

AndyMH wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 10:20 am
For games, you will be dual booting for the foreseeable (outside of the oculus rift, I don't play games, so no expert), for everything else there is almost always a linux alternative to your favourite program, all you need to do is ask.
Actually, I dual booted years ago with Windows 98SE and Windows 2004 server. Hated every minute of it. There are plenty of Steam games and DOSBOX games that work in Linux.

I'm the type where it's one thing only, so it's either Linux or Windows. The way I see it, what's the point in dual booting, because I'm not going to physically disconnect the internet cable from the PC everytime I want to use windows, then I see it like, well I'm already on blank operating system, I have everything I need already.

For me, it would be nothing but a hassle to keep switching back and forth between operating systems. It's just me. After my dual booting experience, I'll never go back to it.
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by AndyMH »

For me, it would be nothing but a hassle to keep switching back and forth between operating systems. It's just me. After my dual booting experience, I'll never go back to it.
I'm not going to argue against you, but it's not much of a hassle now*. Providing you install mint in the same mode as win (either both legacy or both UEFI), grub (the linux bootloader) will give you a menu giving you the choice of mint or win. As linux read/writes ntfs partitions data sharing is easy. It's how I started when I came back to linux after a 15 year gap, provides a bit of a comfort blanket. The desktop is dual boot (for the rift), but on my laptops I run win7 in a VM with virtualbox (no good for games). While there are excellent linux office packages, I've been using word/excel since the 1980's and not about to change :D

* okay with win7, win10 has been known to screw up linux with its automatic updates.
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by ralplpcr »

AndyMH wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 6:54 pm
While there are excellent linux office packages, I've been using word/excel since the 1980's and not about to change :D
Not to get off-track on this thread, but I've found that running Office 2007 on Wine / PlayOnLinux works quite nicely for everything I've needed. It only works with Word, Excel, & Powerpoint... but that's good enough for me?
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by Rocky Bennett »

To the OP, If you were running Windows 10 before, there is no need for any third-party anti-malware or anti-virus software. The built in Windows Defender is all that is needed in Windows 10.
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Re: Looking for more help regarding Live DVD

Post by BG405 »

You mentioned Skype .. I can confirm that works pretty well in Linux. I've been using skypeforlinux for a while now. The .deb files can be found here in case it's not already installed by default on your system.
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Acer Aspire E11 ES1-111M - LM18.2 KDE 64 ----Two ROMS don't make a WRITE ...
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