WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

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minted11
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WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by minted11 »

Hi, i'm new user of Linux Mint, I'm kind a Linux enthusiast and i have mission to make all my friends and family Linux users, but i have some serious questions so please be patient.

Linux Mint is so so slow on my computer, on same computer I have installed Windows7 ultimate which is incredible fast, so i can someone help me with fastening the Linux?

My computer configuration is something like this:

CPU: AMD 2.08Ghz (ok it's old & only one core CPU, but it is completely sufficient to power Windows7 ultimate ?!)

Memory: 2 GB of DDR RAM

Graphic card: Radeon X1600 series 512MB DDR2

Hard drive: western digital 120GB IDE

Additional details:

I installed Linux side by side Windows7 ultra, so I DO NOT USE LINUX OVER CD!!


PLEASE HELP, i really want to use Linux, and want to all my family and friends to use it, but how could I become Linux activist when I'm not convinced it's good (enough fast for eg.)?
oobetimer

Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by oobetimer »

One common reason is poor partitioning. Default installation makes far too small partition for Mint (I have seen 2.3 GB partitions for Mint :shock: ), so there is no space to work .. :roll:

I think that the advanced partitioning is the best and safest choice .. :wink:

My suggestion for partitions:

1. / root partition --> 10 GB
2. swap partition --> 1-2 BG
3. /home -partition --> big enough (10 to 1000'000 GB)
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meandean
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by meandean »

what is slow about it?
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by minted11 »

oobetimer wrote:One common reason is poor partitioning. Default installation makes far too small partition for Mint (I have seen 2.3 GB partitions for Mint :shock: ), so there is no space to work .. :roll:

I think that the advanced partitioning is the best and safest choice .. :wink:

My suggestion for partitions:

1. / root partition --> 10 GB
2. swap partition --> 1-2 BG
3. /home -partition --> big enough (10 to 1000'000 GB)
Total partition size of c:/ is about 19 Gb,

Windows7 ultimate use about 14GB of paritition space, so that leaves atleast 4,5GB for Linux Mint,


After installation of Linux, I still have about 3.22GB of free space so that is more than 2,3GB for work.


The size of LinuxMint system folder on my C:/ is about 688MB.


I would use advanced partitioning, but i want to be sure, Linux installation will not destroy my archives of music, pictures, documents (all the things I gained on Windows),

Infact, i'm used to think in windows logics, in ''C D E partition, logics'' so I'm little bit confused by Linux terminology, /root partition, swap partition....(how do Linux call C, D, E partitions?)


If i set those linux partitions like you suggested, would that destroy my files which are now located on C D E discs?......


My ''free space'' situation on my partitions is not so bright, on C:/ (3,22GB free), on D:/ (4,25GB free), on E:/ (14,1GB free),

so can you suggest me what is best to do?


Additional info:

I can't make more free space on my partitions, also i do not have external hard drive, I can't burn dual layer DVDs, and I don't have money to buy even new bigger hard drive.


I have this CPU (more precise): AMD Athlon XP 2800+ 2,08GHz
minted11
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by minted11 »

meandean wrote:what is slow about it?

Everything is slow, all normal and common things, which are incredible fast on Windows7 (on my Computer), things like moving window frames, resizing the things, waiting for ''right mouse click'' sub menus, handling the menus, opening the programs, opening the internet.

I do not use complex things which do need awesome graphics, or large amounts of memory....

When using Linux, my RAM is used only 9%, but every, even simplest operation, are still incredible slow.....isn't that very irritating & strange?
oobetimer

Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by oobetimer »

minted11 wrote:
When using Linux, my RAM is used only 9%, but every, even simplest operation, are still incredible slow.....isn't that very irritating & strange?
Sounds like a windows .. :lol:

Better not to use Mint4win installation .. :?

Mint4win or Wubi is always slower than normal installation, and I think that your Windows is so fragmented that Mint4win suffers even more than Windows itself .. :roll:
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Fred
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by Fred »

I know some well respected people think Mint4win or Wubi is a good idea, but personally I think it is a terrible idea. It gives you the worst of both worlds. If you want to test Linux before you do a real install that's fine, use the live cd or usb stick. Wubi is far more trouble than it is worth. It is also a good way for a new user to loose both his Linux and Windows install access. I can't count the number of times I have seen people try to uninstall/delete a Wubi install and loose the ability to boot Windows. Or worse yet corrupt the Windows install.

Just one old man's opinion. :-)

Fred
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by minted11 »

oobetimer wrote:
minted11 wrote:
When using Linux, my RAM is used only 9%, but every, even simplest operation, are still incredible slow.....isn't that very irritating & strange?
Sounds like a windows .. :lol:

Better not to use Mint4win installation .. :?

Mint4win or Wubi is always slower than normal installation, and I think that your Windows is so fragmented that Mint4win suffers even more than Windows itself .. :roll:

No, I don't think it's about Windows, since Linux Mandriva which i installed 2 years ago on this same computer was working almost perfect, also I do not use Min4win or Wubi, and fragmentation of Win system is only 5%.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by minted11 »

Fred wrote:I know some well respected people think Mint4win or Wubi is a good idea, but personally I think it is a terrible idea. It gives you the worst of both worlds. If you want to test Linux before you do a real install that's fine, use the live cd or usb stick. Wubi is far more trouble than it is worth. It is also a good way for a new user to loose both his Linux and Windows install access. I can't count the number of times I have seen people try to uninstall/delete a Wubi install and loose the ability to boot Windows. Or worse yet corrupt the Windows install.

Just one old man's opinion. :-)

Fred
Yes i have the same experiences with Mint4win and Wubi, also it is true that those instalations can damage boots, once I even had to install fresh windows because of it.
Last edited by minted11 on Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by Fred »

minted11,

You might look at your graphics driver. Often if you are not using the appropriate driver for your graphics card it will bog down the system. Also, don't turn on a lot of fancy effects. They eat resources like crazy. A few years ago you didn't have all those fancy effects so it would never have been an issue. :-)

Fred
Insanity: Doing the same thing over and over and each time expecting a different result.

Democracy is 2 wolves and a lamb voting on the menu. Liberty is an armed lamb protesting the electoral outcome. A Republic negates the need for an armed protest.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by minted11 »

Fred wrote:minted11,

You might look at your graphics driver. Often if you are not using the appropriate driver for your graphics card it will bog down the system. Also, don't turn on a lot of fancy effects. They eat resources like crazy. A few years ago you didn't have all those fancy effects so it would never have been an issue. :-)

Fred

Fred maybe you're right about drivers, you see, i bought my graphic card on internet, but i have not got any drivers with it, so I guess Windows7 acquired it's shitty drivers for it.

My graphic card is awful, but it's only card I could buy since i don't have much money (I'm not gamer), it's RADEON X1600 series with 512MB of DDR2.

Now, i don't know where to find better drivers for that card.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by randomizer »

I don't have any real helpful ideas, but I'll give you a quick rundown of the filesystem and partition structure of Linux.

Partitions

Unlike Windows, which arbitrarily assigns letters C,D,E to any logical volume or disk drive such that you can't be sure which hard disk the partition belongs to straight away, Linux partitions are named in a way that indicates which hard disk (if any) they are on. All devices in the system are exposed as part of the file system and can be found in /dev. Everything on the system is exposed as a some sort of file, be it a text file, a directory, a network interface or a device.

/dev/sda is the first hard drive in the system. I'm not entirely sure how "first" is defined, but I think it depends on which SATA/PATA (IDE) port the drive is on, and not the BIOS boot order (since /dev/sdb is first in my boot order). /dev/sda1 is the first primary partition on /dev/sda, and /dev/sda2 is the second. /dev/sda4 is normally used as an extended partition if at least 4 partitions are going to be used. An extended partition is a primary partition that contains any number of logical partitions to overcome the normal limit of 4 primaries (due to the small size of the Master Boot Record). If an extended partition is used, /dev/sda5 will be the first logical partition and the number increases from there. Even if you only don't create /dev/sda2 or /dev/sda3, any time you create an extended partition and then a logical it will start at /dev/sda5.

/dev/sdb1 would be the first partition for the second hard drive, or potentially a flash drive if no other hard drives are in the system and a flash drive is inserted.

File system

Windows is installed on C but C is completely separate from the file system tree to D, E and F. On Linux, all files and folders are logically under the root directory called /. They do not need to physically reside on the same partition or even the same hard drive (with a few exceptions, such as /dev). Thus if you browse to the root of your file system you will be able to then drill down to any location regardless of which hard drive it is on. It is not uncommon to have / on its own partition and many other subdirectories of / on their own partitions. Indeed you could mount almost any directory in the system on its own partition if you wanted to. The advantages with this flexibility are most noticed by server admins. If you store /var/log on its own partition and you have a runaway process that is logging things continuously and filling up the drive, it will only be able to fill up the space on its partition. If /var/log was on the same partition as / then it would fill that partition and potentially bring the system to a screeching halt.

For desktop use it isn't really that important. Everything can go on the same partition. You /may want to put /home on its own partition so that you can wipe out everything else and install another distro without losing all your documents and settings.

Swap space can be on its own partition or, if not swap partition exists, it will be like Windows where a simple file is created (in / I think?). Swap can be on any number of partitions and any number of drives and the kernel will use all partitions as the one piece of swap space. This could benefit performance in some situations, but swap space is only used when needed anyway (unlike Windows). Windows will only ever use one swap file at a time if I remember correctly, even if you create more than one.

Here is a rather old but mostly still valid chart showing the breakdown of the basic filesystem hierarchy. A few things may have changed in since this was made. Most notable is the lack of /media, which is normally where floppies, optical drives and flash drives normally reside now. Obviously all the subdirectories of /home will be the names of your users.

Image
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by Old Ruler »

When you say:
Total partition size of c:/ is about 19 Gb,

Windows7 ultimate use about 14GB of paritition space, so that leaves atleast 4,5GB for Linux Mint,

After installation of Linux, I still have about 3.22GB of free space so that is more than 2,3GB for work.

The size of LinuxMint system folder on my C:/ is about 688MB.
It sounds very much like you installed it from within Windows. But then, in reply to Fred, you said:
I do not use Min4win or Wubi
Which sounds contradictory. Did you shrink one of your Windows partitions and install Mint in the reclaimed space? It's by far the best way, unless you have resources to spare, which you haven't really. Combined with using a generic graphics driver, it would certainly explain the poor performance.

Could you write some files you don't often use to DVDs to make say 20GB available on the D: or E: partition, defrag it a couple of times and then use Win7's (really quite good) disk management tool to shrink it, which should leave you some nice unallocated space for a decent Mint installation? Apologies if that's more or less what you did.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by eiver »

First make sure that you installed Mint from the Live CD normally. Make it clear how did you install it - from the posts above I see, that there is much confusion about that.

Second - enable Compiz - thats the easiest way to see if your graphic card drivers work correctly.
I have Mint running on several machines - one of them is:

AMD Athlon 1900+ XP (1.6 GHz) ( 1 core)
1.5 GB RAM
Geforce 6

which is below your specs, and I still get 60+ FPS in Compiz with all those fancy effects enabled.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by Silent Warrior »

About the drivers... Do the FGLRX-set even support the X1600 these days? So xorg-video-radeon would be the only choice?

minted11: I suppose now is as good a time as any to mention that ATI's cards have usually not worked so well with Linux. It's turning around now, but the X1600 is from the 'bad old days'. I know I had a pretty grand struggle with my X1900 in earlier Ubuntu-releases in order to get Compiz running. (And meanwhile 2D ran just gloriously...) And later on, my chassi fried that thing... Anyway. FGLRX-drivers are the official drivers from ATI - which probably don't support your card anymore. There are open-source drivers, but last time I checked (how many years ago, now?) they didn't do 3D very well - though your card will be supported for sure.
If you're using VESA-drivers, that's bound to be the reason things are so slow for you. Um, just don't remove that set all at once, though - they're always good to have around for a rainy day.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by minted11 »

randomizer wrote:I don't have any real helpful ideas, but I'll give you a quick rundown of the filesystem and partition structure of Linux.

Partitions

Unlike Windows, which arbitrarily assigns letters C,D,E to any logical volume or disk drive such that you can't be sure which hard disk the partition belongs to straight away, Linux partitions are named in a way that indicates which hard disk (if any) they are on. All devices in the system are exposed as part of the file system and can be found in /dev. Everything on the system is exposed as a some sort of file, be it a text file, a directory, a network interface or a device.

/dev/sda is the first hard drive in the system. I'm not entirely sure how "first" is defined, but I think it depends on which SATA/PATA (IDE) port the drive is on, and not the BIOS boot order (since /dev/sdb is first in my boot order). /dev/sda1 is the first primary partition on /dev/sda, and /dev/sda2 is the second. /dev/sda4 is normally used as an extended partition if at least 4 partitions are going to be used. An extended partition is a primary partition that contains any number of logical partitions to overcome the normal limit of 4 primaries (due to the small size of the Master Boot Record). If an extended partition is used, /dev/sda5 will be the first logical partition and the number increases from there. Even if you only don't create /dev/sda2 or /dev/sda3, any time you create an extended partition and then a logical it will start at /dev/sda5.

/dev/sdb1 would be the first partition for the second hard drive, or potentially a flash drive if no other hard drives are in the system and a flash drive is inserted.

File system

Windows is installed on C but C is completely separate from the file system tree to D, E and F. On Linux, all files and folders are logically under the root directory called /. They do not need to physically reside on the same partition or even the same hard drive (with a few exceptions, such as /dev). Thus if you browse to the root of your file system you will be able to then drill down to any location regardless of which hard drive it is on. It is not uncommon to have / on its own partition and many other subdirectories of / on their own partitions. Indeed you could mount almost any directory in the system on its own partition if you wanted to. The advantages with this flexibility are most noticed by server admins. If you store /var/log on its own partition and you have a runaway process that is logging things continuously and filling up the drive, it will only be able to fill up the space on its partition. If /var/log was on the same partition as / then it would fill that partition and potentially bring the system to a screeching halt.

For desktop use it isn't really that important. Everything can go on the same partition. You /may want to put /home on its own partition so that you can wipe out everything else and install another distro without losing all your documents and settings.

Swap space can be on its own partition or, if not swap partition exists, it will be like Windows where a simple file is created (in / I think?). Swap can be on any number of partitions and any number of drives and the kernel will use all partitions as the one piece of swap space. This could benefit performance in some situations, but swap space is only used when needed anyway (unlike Windows). Windows will only ever use one swap file at a time if I remember correctly, even if you create more than one.

Here is a rather old but mostly still valid chart showing the breakdown of the basic filesystem hierarchy. A few things may have changed in since this was made. Most notable is the lack of /media, which is normally where floppies, optical drives and flash drives normally reside now. Obviously all the subdirectories of /home will be the names of your users.

Image
Randomiser thanks for your post, it's really good starting point for me.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by Beached »

There may be other reasons why Mint is running slow, however if you do this you will most likely be fine.

From windows Delete your linux mint partition from the device manager. Leave it as free space make it 5 gigs (Delete some ****). Then boot into live CD and go through the set up process. Make the 5 gig partition a 1G and a 4G. use the 1G partition for swap space and the 4G to mount at /

after install is complete fully update it and also download the graphics drivers. (updating will not download your graphics drivers in most situations since they are proprietary.) restart and you should be fine.

Also, since your birthday or xmas is coming (what ever is first) ask for some computer parts. you can re-use the case, cd player, and get a new mobo, processor, RAM, HD all for around 200 and will be a huge upgrade.
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by harpomarx »

Ok, like you I am fairly new to Linux mint.
First of all yeah the cpu is easily able to handle mint. I run a dell 2.8Ghz cpu and 1 gig of ram it is sufficient for all my needs. However I would dismiss your claim that windows 7 ultimate runs faster than Linux. What benchmark testing brought you to this idea, or was it just a perception? TBH I found that under gnome my perception was that Linux runs faster and, under KDE, windows 7 ultimate and linux appear about the same speed, however, all sorts of factors come into play. First off, get rid of unnecessary eye candy such as screen effects, then get rid of icon animations. pare down the startup applications, the worst offender is the printer spool - if you dont need it dont use it.
just go through all the settings and stop using anything you dont need.
I am still a bit bugged by your claim windows runs faster. This is just your perception i doubt theres benchmarks that would prove that
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eiver
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by eiver »

harpomarx wrote:unnecessary eye candy such as screen effects, then get rid of icon animations
UNNECESSARY ?? How can you say something like that? :wink: <joke>
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Re: WHY IS LINUX MINT SO SLOW ON RELATIVELY GOOD COMPUTER?

Post by DrHu »

Fred wrote:I know some well respected people think Mint4win or Wubi is a good idea, but personally I think it is a terrible idea. It gives you the worst of both worlds. If you want to test Linux before you do a real install that's fine, use the live cd or usb stick. Wubi is far more trouble than it is worth.
I agree with Fred, in fact he beat me to the punch

Yes, I think it is wubi (mint4win) that is slowing the Linux OS more than normal
--it is not running Linux natively, but as a kind of VM guest OS

Unless you give Linux the same respect you are giving windows, as well as any troubleshooting steps you want to apply, with Linux running on its own partition, and therefore booting up normally, just as you are doing with win7
  • It isn't a fair comparison
As well, it seems that you might need to play windows games or use windows OS client software for on-line games (WOW --World of Warcraft, I guess), you will be better off doing a multi-boot, so that you can see Linux run as it is meant to (run).
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