Why do new people give up on Linux?

Chat about Linux in general
The Pool Man
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by The Pool Man »

The Pool Man wrote:I'm going to that Atraci page and try out their approach.
Update. I tried this yesterday and it wouldn't allow me to use the posted code. An early error message occurred. (Making the installs suck message above.) However --

-- I noticed that Atraci was removable and reinstallable from Software Manager. I did that. The same error I experienced came back: that it could take 5 tries to quit the app. Then I had this strange feeling that it wasn't the app locking or broken but that the simple close button wasn't 'clickable' from all parts of it.

Sure enough, after much clicking, the bottom halves of my maximize/miminize/close buttons in Atraci were 'broken'. That is -- click the lower half and nothing happens. Click the upper half... and the buttons behave properly.

This identical app and their buttons works as intended in eOS, and so my hunch is that Atraci's buttons don't play well with Mint KDE adjustments. That when I changed the size of those buttons in Mint, Atraci didn't follow. I feel this way because their buttons look custom instead of system-y.
Atraci places the buttons 'small' on the right.  KDE places them on the left and larger.
Atraci places the buttons 'small' on the right. KDE places them on the left and larger.
snapshot12.jpg (3.6 KiB) Viewed 3402 times
I suspect it isn't playing nice.
curtvaughan
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by curtvaughan »

Linux is a hobby for folks who love tinkering with computers and software. If you don't love computing, Linux isn't for you.
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Barbados99
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Barbados99 »

A couple of weeks ago I upgraded to the Mint Cinnamon 17.1. I use Windows at work, and Mint at home. I used to dual-boot Linux and Windows at home, but about a year ago I realized that I just didn't use the Windows boot anymore because I liked the Mint better. I don't enjoy tinkering with my computer like a lot of folks do. I just want to do my stuff and not have to fight the computer. In past years I would get pretty frustrated fighting the Linux because it seemed to require constant tinkering. But this Mint has come a long ways to relieve me of that frustration. I pretty much just load it now and forget it. Seriously. I don't even think about the operating system anymore (and that's a good thing). I haven't dual booted in a long time, so about a year ago I just got rid of windows on this computer. It's just a Mint machine now. I really really like it too.

One other thing is that the software that runs on Linux seems to have come a long ways also. I really don't miss the Windows software at all now. Linux has quality software and it's free. At least the stuff I use is free. I use the cloud a lot and I've noticed that I can often use my Linux software at home, to work on files for the office and then just save it in a format that works with my Windows software at work. It's not perfect, but pretty near perfect. This is something I couldn't do very well in years past. But now it's pretty cool. I have to believe that Microsoft must be getting a bit uncomfortable with the progress being made with Linux software now.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by linuxeffect »

I second the last post. I'm trying out Linux, currently Mint, and various versions of Ubuntu. I can see why so many people, put off by Windows 8's app screen, were initially jumping straight to a Linux OS, a free operating system. They may have wanted a traditional desktop that resembled Windows in some way, not realising that what they saw on the outside wasn't necessarily what they received. They may have been the users jumping off, back to Windows or Apple, noting that certain features from windows were either not available without further installations, not easy to locate, or that Linux incompatibilities and bugs were not fixed or ironed out with their hardware. They may also... be unwilling to use any terminal command centre. Windows no longer requires users to use the DOS command line. Whilst it is true that multiple functions may be possible with a couple of commands in such an interface, compared to clicking many many times within a programs gui, the bottom line is that those put off, are unwilling to learn how to use it. They see that as taking even more of their time.

We may be more computer-apt than ever, but we are living in a world of mobile phones and touchscreen. These days, very few people have any patience. It has been said that the generation brought up with the internet, and the heaviest of users, may have the least patience of all. People often scroll down news articles as an example, trying to find the most important aspects, and comment, not realising that what they are writing is irrelevant. They didn't read it fully. It happens so often. So many want everything they do on a computer now, to be done as fast as possible. I believe the terminal and possible requirements for installing programs outside of the software manager, along with the unarguable lack of enough major third party support, may be the biggest reasons for any departure.

There is a visual side of comfortableness too. An easy on the eyes gui or screen layout that shows everything you need within one click helps,but if you have used Windows or any other OS for many years, a different system might be awkward at first. When I started using a folder icon changing program in Windows for the first time, however close to the original some available styles of icon might be to what I had before, it was a slower experience overall. The slightest of icon changes for differing file types, really does make a difference, even if those files are in shown in 'detail' mode. Mint's desktop resembles Windows arguably closer than any other version of Linux, but it's still not exactly the same. It may take time for some to get used to. So many shouted out about a start menu being replaced by a screen with Windows 8, so not finding everything else you want in the same place within Linux as Windows, is likely also going to be too much for some.

Everyone that likes the technical side of computer systems, should enjoy the (arguably retro) aspect of using terminal commands for general usage and in order to fix problems that may arise. Learning to use a terminal can be a challenge and hobby on the side for beginners, for those more interested in computing than the average member of the public. Of course that does not mean that anyone cannot learn, but that is why I decided to install Mint along with Windows as a partition. My favourite version of Windows ironically, is 8.1, having used XP the most, as well as spending a fair while on Vista and 7.
Last edited by linuxeffect on Sat Mar 07, 2015 6:20 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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InkKnife
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by InkKnife »

curtvaughan wrote:Linux is a hobby for folks who love tinkering with computers and software. If you don't love computing, Linux isn't for you.
That may have been the case but not anymore. I switched from OSX to Linux because Linux had become good enough so it was not a hobby OS anymore but a full blown competitor to Windows or OSX. For three years I have used nothing but Linux at home in the form of Mint/Cinnamon and Mint is no more a hobby to be than OSX or Windows were.
A nice thing about Linux is it can a hobby if you want it to be but that is entirely optional now. Linux Mint is a great desktop OS that is stable, fast and easy to use, heck, My wife runs Linux Mint and she could not be less interested in computers.
Mint is Linux all grown up, no manual required.
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bawldiggle
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by bawldiggle »

Over about 12 years I attempted to try Linux .. always coming to a dead end due to a lack of active support
- and my loss of nerve ... like bungy jumping !

Forum responses delivered glib one liners which left me none the wiser ... and really p----d off.
- and too often no responses at all.
- worst was Libre Office let alone which Linux OS to use ?
- so I stayed with M$ for -- Quickbooks Pro and Excel VBA and AutoCad.

About 2 years ago I found the courage to look into imaging Windows with Macrium ... partitions ... and taking responsibility for my 6 PCs health.

At sevenforums.com is a senior member "whs" who was/is an advocate for "Mint Mate" ... his thread The installation and handling of Linux Mint Mate - Tutorial inspired me.
- I also stumbled over a YouTube about MintMate by whs ... (I cannot lay my hands on the URL)
- when I found this Mint forum and saw the activity -- I decided to give Linux another try. I have not looked back :D
- still booting Mint from a USB stick ... due to a lack of spare time

What I appreciate about this Mint Form is the incredible dedication of helpers and the range self help for beginners too.
** Inspite of my post count I am a newbie, trying to get my head around Linux -- simple, clear details for a dummy would be appreciated
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Welly Wu
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Welly Wu »

The chief reason why people give up on GNU/Linux is because they are unwilling to make the commitment to learn the mindset required to learn a new and different desktop and mobile operating system and they are unwilling to give up their favorite software applications that are not available in GNU/Linux. It's the classic chicken vs. egg dilemma and there are no compelling reasons other than lower cost structures to adopt GNU/Linux at this point. However, GNU/Linux will become a significant and healthy competitor to Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh OS X, but it will take several long years if not a few more decades for it to be considered a viable "free" alternative. Until PC OEMs and ODMs along with independent software vendors get behind GNU/Linux on the desktop home consumer market, there is not enough of a compelling reason why new users should even consider it in the first place. There are virtually no exclusive killer apps available on GNU/Linux that don't have a more popular commercial version in Microsoft Windows or Apple Macintosh OS X. The chief culprit is the mainstream media. They do no promulgate GNU/Linux to the masses so it is relatively unheard of even among computer geeks. Without a well financed and sustained worldwide marketing campaign replete with very robust media coverage of GNU/Linux and FLOSS philosophy and technologies, GNU/Linux will remain a niche desktop and mobile operating system for the foreseeable future.

This is not necessarily a bad thing per se. Carving out a small but growing market share is attainable in the current environment and GNU/Linux has already succeeded in this regard. For it to overtake Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh OS X, GNU/Linux is simply going to need more than positive word of mouth recommendations from family members, relatives, friends, and co-workers. Teaching the mindset necessary to learn GNU/Linux especially on the home consumer desktop market is very challenging in this current environment because of this classic chicken vs. egg dilemma. Hardware manufacturers and software vendors need to have relative certainty that GNU/Linux is a healthy ecosystem that can generate respectable revenues and profits beyond the corporate and enterprise server and supercomputer markets. It has been well over 20.00 years since Linus Torvalds and the GNU project released GNU/Linux and it has consistently failed to grab the attention of the lucrative home consumer desktop market share because it is perceived as foreign and way too geeky if not downright difficult to learn the mindset. It is an exclusive boys club and both girls and women are not reared to learn GNU/Linux in appreciable numbers worldwide other than less developed countries where economic factors play a significant role in determining which technology products and services enter their limited markets.

There are not enough compelling reasons why Apple and Microsoft customers should even consider GNU/Linux when they are spoon fed all of the neat new features and capabilities that closed source, proprietary, and commercial desktop and mobile operating systems offer to them in terms of products and services. For this reason alone, GNU/Linux has to fight a long and very hard fight to gain market share worldwide and it has to compete on its merits alone. Without the availability of high quality, closed source, proprietary, and commercial software applications being ported over to GNU/Linux, people worldwide are participating in vendor lock in and they are supporting it with their money every time they choose to buy a PC or Mac and they generate revenues and profits for those closed ecosystems.
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WinterTroubles
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by WinterTroubles »

Welly Wu wrote:It is an exclusive boys club and both girls and women are not reared to learn GNU/Linux in appreciable numbers worldwide...
I don't wish to take issue with the general thrust of your post above, http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.p ... 83#p993083, I may not agree totally but respect your opinion. I do, however, feel it is a little unfair ( if not blatantly sexist) to single out 'girls and women' as 'not reared to learn GNU/Linux'. As we all know Linux as a home computing desktop solution holds only a small market share and as such people are not reared to learn GNU/Linux in appreciable numbers worldwide. A persons gender has no relation as to whether they were raised/educated in a Linux environment or not. As for Linux being an exclusive boys club, I'm sure our female forum members may be slightly put out to feel so ignored :mrgreen:

I fully accept that cultural differences may be at work here and nether wish to cause offence or imply offence was intentionally caused.

Regards and respect,
WT

Edited once to remove a typo :oops:
17.1Cinn/17.1Xfce

If solved please edit the subject line of your first post to include [Solved] so other users know there's a solution in the topic.

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zoli62
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by zoli62 »

This is an interesting question. The Linux desktop has been not only the geeks playground. Nevertheless it is still less used. Perhaps because it requires more circumspection and learning , such as Windows.
Last edited by zoli62 on Thu Mar 12, 2015 12:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
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bawldiggle
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by bawldiggle »

I am 70 years old.
Considerable experience with Excel programming (in VBA), some scripting ... but just a click and use Windows-er!
- nothing smarter than that

About 15 years ago I looked at Linux and the jargon (on both home pages and forums) was over whelming.
- I ran with my tail between legs.

Granted -- there is an element of "laziness" on MS/Apple fans to learn something new.
BUT Linux has to live with "what is" and blaming customers for not coming into the shop resolves nothing.

What turned me away from Linux (all those years ago) was the complexity of setting it up on a machine. Windows is almost tap and go
- and the one line (meaningless) answers on Linux forums, let alone find a forum that is newbie friendly.
- there was a lot of geek snobbery on various forums

Three years ago (I am still self employed) I got fed up with mediocre IT techs, and decided to fix my own Windows machines (5 in all, 3 for AutoCad)

At sevenforums.com is a member whs in his late 70s (an IBM programmer) who inspired me to have a go at Mint Mate.
Several things inspired me to give Linux a go ...
  • whs youtube demo
  • this forum (phpBB) is a common structure -- familiar -- I knew where to go and "look", and how to drive it
    Some forums are so clever they out smart themselves ... and lose customers
    • And then there are the (nameless) Linux forums that rely on a wall of emails .. in the first 24 hours I received 88 emails, of which 2 were responses to my question.
      (Of course I am sitting around waiting for emails that amount to "junk"[!], because they are too advanced for my level of expertise)

      I still back away from complexity, because around the corner there is probably another shop/forum who I can relate to.
  • this Mint forum was busy, plenty of activity, and dates on responses were "quick" ...a very positive sign
  • helpers on this forum were presenting a co-operative demeanor. Friendly, nothing was too much trouble
    Newbies don't know a question has been asked hundreds of times .. helpers getting "shirty" about a newbie, should find another job.
    (A lot of other forums are in a coma, with the most recent question 2+ years old.)
  • The dedicated sub-forum ... Newbie Questions -- All Gurus once were Newbies ... made my first experience a lot easier, because I viewed Linux as all geek-world
In my personal experience one of the most successful forums is sevenforums.com ... have a look at the bottom of the BoardIndex page
- a lot of guests and members, as I write 11,000 guests
- it is where I cut my teeth, soiled my nappy and learnt a LOT about Windows

IMO a large part of their success is SevenForums Tutorials, assembled by volunteers
- most volunteers are older with decades of experience and then there are some very clever young people too, youngest genius on BSOD is 17 years old.

The first thing I looked for on forums.linuxmint.com were Tutorials

Personally I am still dabbling with Mint, experimenting when I have the time.
- I have had more success with left-of-field questions in this forum than with anywhere else

For my money Mint and this forum are an excellent combo, I would like to suggest "Tutorials" to tempt customers into the "free MINT" shop
- I would enjoy being part of the Mint push :)
** Inspite of my post count I am a newbie, trying to get my head around Linux -- simple, clear details for a dummy would be appreciated
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nuagedeboucane
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by nuagedeboucane »

The very first reason is that you have to be motivated. You must WANT to use it. If you're not sincerly into it, you will go back to M$ or the big fruit. :lol: as soon as you will encounter any minor problem.

I'm a motivated newbie, and I want to use a Linux distro, especially Mint.

At home, we have 9 old computers. I'm "in charge of maintaining them in good working state". When I have decided to put Mint on them, I told my wife and kids:

- " Since Windows XP is no longer supported, it is becoming dangerous to continue using it. We all love the fact that we have a lot of computers, even if that they're old. Upgrading them with a newer version of Windows is impossible. Our machines wouldn't even be able to run it, for most of them. So we have to use a more secure operating system, that we can afford (free). You have to learn to use it, if you want to use the net. The only time you're allowed to use Windows is for local gaming, with our already installed games."

My wife decides almost everything in the house, apart from computers. (As long as it costs nothing) :lol: So we run Mint at /home, and there will not have a come back to W$.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Welly Wu »

I did not read this entire thread, but I do have two close friends of mine that I converted to Ubuntu 64 bit LTS GNU/Linux. Robert W. and Veronica C. now use it on their System76 Lemur Ultra (lemu4) and ASUS A53E-AS31 notebook PCs. Together, we ditched Microsoft Windows 7 and 8.1 64 bit permanently. Of course, I provide them with free technical support for their entire lives and I use the latest version of TeamViewer 32 bit. They get along with Ubuntu GNU/Linux pretty well, but they are casual computer users that just surf the World Wide Web using Google Chrome or download a few pictures or videos on occasion. I am the power GNU/Linux user and I have several years of knowledge, multiple IT certifications and an advanced degree in IT administration and security, and plenty of experience using almost all of the major GNU/Linux distributions today. I choose to use the latest Ubuntu 64 bit LTS GNU/Linux version because it just works and I like the Ubuntu philosophy and I like the future direction that Canonical is taking the brand and platform on the desktop, server, cloud, and mobile platforms. Veronica started using Ubuntu 14.04.2 64 bit LTS GNU/Linux less than two weeks ago and she is thrilled with it. I only gave her five minutes of instruction on how to use it and she has never contacted me for technical support yet. Robert has been using Ubuntu 64 bit LTS GNU/Linux since April 2012. He contacts me more frequently for technical support, but he hasn't quit using GNU/Linux and switched back to Microsoft Windows yet.

The key is free technical support from a trusted expert who happens to be a family member, relative, or friend that lives close by or who can use remote desktop software application to connect to their PCs from time to time. Providing expertise technical support and becoming a teacher to new Linux users is the fundamental cornerstone. Once people feel comfortable that they are well supported, then they will easily adapt to using GNU/Linux especially if a trusted expert listens carefully and pays attention to the small details to provide a good user experience by choosing the right GNU/Linux distribution to meet individual needs. Of course, Robert and Veronica are not particularly demanding computer users so my job is much easier.

I think that anyone can learn to use virtually any FLOSS or commercial desktop or mobile operating system if given an array of simplified choices at a price that they can afford over a long period of time. Robert has a lot of money and time, but very little technical expertise. Veronica has a lot of time, but she has little money and extremely limited technical knowledge. For them, I came into their lives at the right time and place and I helped them to make the transition to Ubuntu GNU/Linux as painless as possible. I provided them with their System76 and ASUS notebook PCs for free of charge. So, I provide them with hardware and software technical support. I also teach them how to solve basic computing tasks when they do have a question about how to do something on their computers. I maintain their Ubuntu GNU/Linux distributions by keeping them up to date with their software packages and I purchase, download, install, and share software applications for them to use along with the lessons that they need to learn how to use each piece of hardware and software product and service.

I am doing my small part to spread the GNU/Linux love and to grow the number of active and lifelong users just like many other members here in this Linux Mint and Ubuntu Forums communities.

GNU/Linux is not terribly difficult to learn even for people that have only known how to use either Apple Macintosh OS X or Microsoft Windows for several years or decades if a trusted expert is there to help them with every single aspect of teaching them how to adapt and grow to become confident and capable GNU/Linux users over time.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by helloimustbegoing »

One reason I'd say is because a few things don't work "out of the box" in Linux. Another is that sometimes solving one problem only creates another. I'm going through this problem right now [here: http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=47&t=194938 EDIT: problem has since been solved].

I myself probably would've given up by now if Microsoft would stop making stupid decisions [stupid IMO].
Last edited by helloimustbegoing on Sat May 09, 2015 7:46 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by exploder »

I think a lot of people give up because they think Linux should work the same way Windows does. Not that both don't have their own quirks but they are so used to Windows from not being exposed to anything else. I am sure that some get frustrated too with hardware that does not have Linux support. Some people are better off with whatever came with their hardware. Someone that really wants to run Linux will and they will work out the problems they have.

Linux is not right for everyone and we just have to accept that and not force our views on them. I switched to Linux years ago because I was genuinely interested. I have had my fair share of problems over the years but I can still remember having problems with proprietary systems too. My daughter runs the Mac OS, it fit her needs and she is happy so I never try to push Linux on her. She did use my computer when I was in the hospital and told me she liked the OS I had installed at the time.

My oldest son runs Windows, he does not have the same interest in computers as me. He hardly ever uses the computer at all, his laptop came with Windows and he has no reason to change that. My two youngest boys could care less what platform they are running on, all they care about is the software. Some of my former co-workers would ask me to install Linux for them, most of them were tired of problems with viruses or family members installing software they did not want on their systems.

We are all different, we have different needs and priorities. Linux suits my needs and I appreciate it for what it can do, not everyone feels this way. Live and let live and be happy with your own choices. :)
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Pierre »

having re-installed lots of versions of M$ windows, over the years,
- it is never straight forward, with something always *not* working OOB :o
the usual suspects were Audio / Video / Ethernet - with one or more of them *not* working OOB.

upgrading to a newer M$ O/S ? - betcha some of your hardware won't work OOB. :shock:
- you'll have to purchase some new hardware - to go with your new O/S.
no surprises there, either. ..

And those same OPs will complain - if their 'new' Linux O/S doesn't work OOB :!:
- yes - some things aren't OOB perfect - in the Linux World - but neither was your M$ system.

and yeah - it's virus free.
:D
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Nilla Wafer »

Welly Wu wrote: (Linux) has consistently failed to grab the attention of the lucrative home consumer desktop market share because it is perceived as foreign and way too geeky if not downright difficult to learn the mindset. It is an exclusive boys club and both girls and women are not reared to learn GNU/Linux in appreciable numbers.
I guess one reason it is perceived as foreign and geeky is just because it's not Windows or OSX. It doesn't "come with the computer" at the store, and it's not installed like a program where you just double-click an .exe file. Anything that doesn't install with a double-click is "foreign and geeky" to some people. An operating system is foreign and geeky if it wasn't installed at the factory. So I think that can be overcome if people sell computers that "come with" Linux Mint on them or any Linux that is as easy to use as Mint.

As for the "girls and women" thing I am not so sure that's true. Maybe it used to be when women were homemakers and most did not have outside careers other than nursing, serving tables, and teaching school. After I saw how easy Linux Mint was to use, I installed it from a USB stick without any adult or male "supervision." Point and click, create a name and password, done. Not geeky at all, and not necessarily "masculine."

~nilla
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Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Joshual1177 »

I think it makes sense sometimes to have one computer, if your home has more than one, to run Windows. My wife has a Dell laptop that is about 5-6 years old running Vista. She uses a few programs that only run on Windows. Plus, we both have iPhones. And we need iTunes in order sync and connect our phones to. I am currently dual booting between Mint 17 and Windows 7 on my desktop and I only boot into Windows once a month or so.

Recently my wife was trying to print something from Excel on her laptop to the printer connected to my Linux Desktop and it didn't work right away. So she immediately made the statement that it she always has trouble printing and blames Linux. All I had to do was reboot my computer and it worked. This would be my only gripe about running two different os's on the same network. They don't always communicate with each other perfectly.

But windows is so slow on my desktop, it makes it unusable. It runs Mint 17 XFCE like a dream.


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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Barbados99 »

I think fewer people give up on Linux than even a few years ago. Sure, some do. But I'll bet it's a lower percentage than what it used to be. I run Windows at work and Linux at home. I was thinking this morning about the fact that I now have more problems with my work computer than the Linux computer. My Linux machine that runs Mint, just runs without any problems (I can't remember the last time I had to fight some stupid problem like I do at work on those Windows machines). I'm responsible for the PC's and laptops at the office that run Windows. There's probably some kind of issue I'm wrestling with 2 or 3 times a week (on one of them). It's a pain. At home it's pretty rare to have to do anything with Linux. It just runs problem free now.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by exploder »

I think people just need more exposure to Linux. People are taught in schools mostly on Windows based PC's and kind of end up with a Windows mind set as a result. My younger boys have always ran Linux at home and they are comfortable using any OS. Things are slowly changing though, products like the Mint Box and major manufacturers offer systems with Ubuntu, Suse and Red Hat. The Linux based systems are not advertised the same way the Windows machines are though...

I installed Ubuntu 14.04 for an elderly friend because his grandchildren kept installing things on his Windows 7 computer and messed it up all the time. My friend only really knew the few applications he used and nothing more. I went with Ubuntu simply because it had the guest account, I told him to have his grandchildren use the guest account so they could no longer screw up his computer.

A few weeks later my friend told me he loved Windows 8! I told him, you are not running Windows 8, you are running Ubuntu Linux! He did not know the difference, all he knew was that the applications he needed worked and his computer stayed running nice. My friend because of his age and experience was not trapped in a Windows mind set.

Computer stores only offer computers with Windows, there are some that might have a few Apple machines but there is no Linux based machines available for purchase. If you want a computer with a Linux distribution on it you either have to already know of a vendor that offers this option or you have to seek out one on your own. Some people are afraid to leave their comfort zone too. They only know Windows for example and they have no desire to try anything that might be different.

My Father-In-Law was afraid to leave his comfort zone! I was re-installing Windows for him every few months. Finally he said he wanted to try Linux. He had seen Ubuntu on a computer I was working on and asked if I would install it for him. He had some questions at first but he has had no problems for a couple of years now! He broke free from the Windows mind set! When it was time to upgrade his OS I asked him if he would like to try Linux Mint? He said, no, he wanted to stay with Ubuntu because he knew how to use it... At least he does not have problems anymore!

I really believe that if more people were exposed to Linux they would not give up on it.
joseph8
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Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2015 6:11 pm

Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by joseph8 »

I installed my first Linux box in 94 from a big stack of floppy disks my dad made me for Christmas. I used Linux on and off for for a few years before trying to go "pure" Linux at home and at work... I actually purchased a Suse disk. This lasted for another few years - but I ended up switching to Windows XP on all my machines about the time SP2 came out. I did this because:

1. Lack of driver support
I do occasionally want to use NEW stuff like webcams, printers, touchpads, modems, wifi, bluetooth, laptop goodies, graphics cards etc. without having to wait until the technology is a year or two old so it is supported. I have tried (even in the depths of my Windows depression) to find Linux compatible stuff along the way...

2. Lack of commercial software
-- MS Office. (yes I know there is Wine and it works marginally sometimes for some versions) Everyone expects you to have a working copy for their stupid crazy document.
--Adobe Reader for fillabe forms - no they don't always work with Okular.
-- Good multimedia editors for video (this is getting better now, but it was painful at best compared to ROXIO or NERO when I made the switch to XP),
-- WebEx, JoinMe, etc.
-- flash player in later years,
-- and... my wife always wanted Quicken, Finale and MS Publisher

I have come back to Linux now for about two months, after years of swearing it off for desktop use (I have used it on servers consistently throughout this time). For something like 10 years I secretly pined for a desktop Linux whilst using XP and 7, I dislike using Windows and always have, I read Linux news and watched Wine and got excited for ReactOS for a while also. Windows 8 almost drove me back to Linux when I tried it - ick. I have gone to great lengths to make windows more Linuxy (window blinds, Cygwin, firefox, gimp), but I always wished I was back on Linux.

Trying it again now. I really love Linux, I love the way it works and feels etc... I don't mind getting my hands dirty so long as options are available within some reasonable amount of effort. So I hope I can continue to make it work... I am doing fairly well by using a Windows 7 install in VirtualBox for Office 2013 (for work docs), WebEx and the occasional forms based PDF file. I have found alternatives for everything else. I am just going to keep the wife's machine on Windows to keep harmony in my marriage.
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