Crowdfunding Porting Programs to Linux

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Kenneth1
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Crowdfunding Porting Programs to Linux

Post by Kenneth1 » Fri Apr 01, 2016 4:05 pm

Does anyone know if there is an organized effort to crowd fund porting programs to linux? I know crossover does it, but it's not cheap, especially if you're just one person like me. Crossover said a program costs 3000 dollar, plus 150 dollars an hour for special development plus 5 dollars per license with a minimum of 100 purchase. I for one would love to get in on this. Heck not just games. Why not business programs? As one person the cost to run something on linux without wine is prohibitive, but if we started using people power, we can keep adding great programs to our fantastic OS.

If anyone knows about such efforts, please let me know, as I would like to partake.

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amethyst_igor
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Re: Crowdfunding Porting Programs to Linux

Post by amethyst_igor » Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:23 pm

Kenneth1 wrote:Does anyone know if there is an organized effort to crowd fund porting programs to linux? I know crossover does it, but it's not cheap, especially if you're just one person like me. Crossover said a program costs 3000 dollar, plus 150 dollars an hour for special development plus 5 dollars per license with a minimum of 100 purchase. I for one would love to get in on this. Heck not just games. Why not business programs? As one person the cost to run something on linux without wine is prohibitive, but if we started using people power, we can keep adding great programs to our fantastic OS.

If anyone knows about such efforts, please let me know, as I would like to partake.
I don't think that porting existing programs to Linux is really viable, long-term, without the source code, because some companies really don't want this to happen and take proactive measures to prevent it.

Some programs are designed from the ground up for all platforms. Take Qbittorrent. It runs on Mac, Linux, and Windows. I find that it is the best torrent client, too, although in the past, I've also liked Ktorrent, but Qbittorrent appears to get more dev love. My personal preference is for multi-platform programs that I can use on all my rigs, so I don't have to learn a whole new bag of tricks just to play with Linux or Windows.

Other programs, like ACDSee, only work on Windows and Mac. Now, I like ACDSee, but the fact it doesn't work on my favorite OS is a major drawback in my opinion, and probably the biggest single reason that I retain Windows 10 systems at all. I just can't GIMP along through life.

Now you may ask yourself, why is it that ACDSee never supported Linux, after all these years (over a decade, seriously, this is an old program)? Why is it ACDSee ignores numerous requests from customers to port to Linux? Why is it ACDSee won't work, even in Wine, and many have attempted and failed to get it to work?

Boils down to money. ACDSee is a little nervous about the whole Linux free software thing. They are definitely about hitting the customer up for money. So you have some companies that purposefully exclude Linux, because they don't trust the business model in our world. But a lot of open-source, free software programs do not share this concern, and instead rely upon voluntary donations, so they support all platforms. You see, it is not so difficult to be platform-independent. A little bit of extra effort perhaps, but there are compilers for major languages in Linux, Mac, and Windows. So when you have a source code, you can compile it for any OS you want. Maybe a few tweaks here and there, but it does not appear to be a big deal.
I run both Windows 10 and Linux Mint 18 in dual boot with two SSDs and have other rigs running various versions of Linux. My blog.

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Re: Crowdfunding Porting Programs to Linux

Post by Hoser Rob » Sat Apr 09, 2016 10:52 am

I love linux to the point that I don't have any Windoze partitions anymore, but why should the devs of ACDSee particularly care about linux? It's less than 2% of the market.

It's not the business model or whatever that's the problem. It's the mongrel nature of Linux distros. Technically, linux is actually just the kernel, and that's not so much of a problem. But there are so many releases and different APIs that open source developers have a hard time with it. Can you blame commercial developers for not bothering with it?

As mentioned, you'd need the source code, no matter that Crossover or anyone else says. If the software devs won't release it, forget it. The same if the software uses closed source formats etc. This is how we ended up with Gimp. All you can do is try to reverse engineer Photoshop, and in Gimp you still don't have proper Pantone support. So Gimp is unusable by professionals.

So while I don't have any windows partitions anymore, I'm not a gamer and I don't use Photoshop or other program I'd need windoze for. Otherwise I'd be dual booting at least one machine.

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Re: Crowdfunding Porting Programs to Linux

Post by amethyst_igor » Sat Apr 09, 2016 2:43 pm

Hoser Rob wrote:I love linux to the point that I don't have any Windoze partitions anymore, but why should the devs of ACDSee particularly care about linux? It's less than 2% of the market.

It's not the business model or whatever that's the problem. It's the mongrel nature of Linux distros. Technically, linux is actually just the kernel, and that's not so much of a problem. But there are so many releases and different APIs that open source developers have a hard time with it. Can you blame commercial developers for not bothering with it?

As mentioned, you'd need the source code, no matter that Crossover or anyone else says. If the software devs won't release it, forget it. The same if the software uses closed source formats etc. This is how we ended up with Gimp. All you can do is try to reverse engineer Photoshop, and in Gimp you still don't have proper Pantone support. So Gimp is unusable by professionals.

So while I don't have any windows partitions anymore, I'm not a gamer and I don't use Photoshop or other program I'd need windoze for. Otherwise I'd be dual booting at least one machine.
Linux today is mainly just *buntu. The others are such a small fraction. No one has even heard of them. And if a program works in Debian, most likely it will work in Ubuntu too. Sometimes volunteers help out the devs to get things working in their distro. When they don't, you have the situation like in PCLinuxOS, where I couldn't find a recent version of my favorite game, Dungeon Crawl Tiles. They had a version from five years ago, I think. This, for a game that is being actively developed with a new release once a year. I compiled the latest version myself for PCLinuxOS, got it working, and followed their procedure for announcing my work and getting it into their repo. No one ever replied. That distro is missing software and refuses to add it. I am not willing to say good-bye forever to software I like to use, just for what, a cute logo of a bull? That is about the time I stopped using PCLinuxOS and went to Linux Mint.

GIMP is unusable by amateurs too in my opinion. I hear lots of love in forums, but no one I know has ever had anything kind to say about it. It is just designed from the ground up to defeat casual users and require reading the manual. With Krita, on the other hand, I was able to actually solve some problems. Thank goodness for Krita.
I run both Windows 10 and Linux Mint 18 in dual boot with two SSDs and have other rigs running various versions of Linux. My blog.

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Re: Crowdfunding Porting Programs to Linux

Post by Portreve » Mon May 09, 2016 12:19 pm

I don't want to derail this thread into a GIMP sucks/rulz rant, but I would like to spend a moment to comment on it.

One of my several professional backgrounds is desktop publishing. As someone who has used PageMaker (as both an Aldus and an Adobe product), InDesign, QuarkXPress, Photoshop, Illustrator, and a host of other programs over the years, I can say with total certainty that GIMP is useful and doesn't hold a candle to Adobe's products. I left the DTP/graphic design industry around the time that the focus shifted from ink-n-paper to web development. At this point, I use GIMP quite a lot, but I use it only because it's useful within the range of capabilities I need now. That, primarily, is as a utility to most of the time render SVGs of layouts I created in Scribus into PNGs with a transparent background. I also do use it for image editing, but that's probably only a 20-25% use case for me.

Now getting back to the substance of this thread, I think there's likely 2-3 reasons why commercial developers choose not to write for GNU+Linux:

1. Market share
2. Fragmentation because "GNU+Linux" is an umbrella, not a single OS
3. Fear of our demographics

I can also think of a pretty darned good reason we should not be trying to shoehorn all of these proprietary applications into GNU+Linux: because they are proprietary. Now, if tomorrow Quark decided to port QXP, then all well and good, and hopefully we would gain some notoriety from it. But it would still mean that Quark would be maintaining a walled garden for their users here.

The biggest issue with most of this software and the companies producing it is some form of lock-in and/or entrapment. In another thread I opined that there are several categories of software which, if the titles belonging to each could find commercial-grade, ready-for-primetime DIRs (drop-in replacements) in the libre community, GNU+Linux could take over.

One of the biggest stumbling blocks, from the standpoint of the libre community, is this "X is good enough for me so I don't give a f*** if it doesn't also do this or that for you" attitude; and, to a slightly lesser extent, the "Well, I don't need X category of software, roll your sleeves up and write it yourself" attitude. These attitudes do not help spur adoption, and wind up being a real turn-off for many potential switchers.
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Re: Crowdfunding Porting Programs to Linux

Post by lmuserx4849 » Wed May 18, 2016 1:21 am

Linux today is mainly just *buntu. The others are such a small fraction. No one has even heard of them.

GIMP is unusable by amateurs too in my opinion. I hear lots of love in forums, but no one I know has ever had anything kind to say about it.
RedHat and SuSE are in the top ten list for contributors to the Linux kernel. RedHat's stock price is $72.44/share. I think someone heard :-) Arch Linux has a loyal following, as does Slackware. But for today's newbies, Ubuntu and it's derivatives like Linux Mint (Distro Watch).

Besides the licensing and patent issues...
There are a lot of applications for linux. They are just as good or better in empowering the user, providing a flexible infrastructure, and giving the user freedom to get the job done. Note: Freedom requires knowledge and responsibility.
Find them and support them. Coders have to eat too :-)
List of free and open-source software packages, use the Software Manager installed on Linux Mint, or ask around. Don't forget to contribute to Linux Mint too :-) Maybe contact: Linux Foundation or Gnu org or Free Desktop org.

Libreoffice is good. Although I ran into a problem due to a speakers' convention requirements. Gimp is awesome, as is okular. xsane for scanning. blender, inkscape. netbeans for development, kate for general gui editing, nano for command line editing. Databases: mysql, postgres, mariadb. GnuCash.

We were all amateurs once. :-) Like anything else pick up a book, search for tutorials (tons on youtube), read the manual.
A couple of books (besides the manual and everything you can find online), "The Book of GIMP" and "The Artist's Guide to GIMP: Creative Techniques for Photographers, Artists, and Designers".

There's an online magazine, Full Circle, that is dedicated to Ubuntu stuff. It has some Gimp articles. There's a gimp magazine and they have a educational dvd too. Meet the Gimp did almost 200 videos mostly on gimp.

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