They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Chat about just about anything else
Post Reply
User avatar
Tater
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2018 9:28 am
Location: PEBCAK

They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Tater »

Hello all,

I've been reading "Which Browser" thread and it got me to thinking: If the primary goal all these companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) is to sell you, as a consumer, to interested third parties, what if you aren't?

What I mean is, the purpose of gathering all the information they can is to pigeon hole you into nice discrete boxes by category so that your attention can be sold to people who are looking to sell things to people in those categories. The more defined of a box you are put in, the better a chance that you are the consumer that the third party wants to influence. What if you don't see ads because you actively block them? What if you only buy esoteric items that very few people know about, and virtually nobody is spending marketing money on? What if you find ads so annoying that they act as negative marketing (If you remember an ad for a product it is a demerit against it)?

The very few ads that I see are so wildly off target or for items that I have just bought on Amazon or eBay. Why do the companies think that if I just bought a small engine carburetor I must be looking for more small engine carburetors? Why do they think I would be interested in any of the things that occasionally leak through, I cannot imagine.

So I wonder how big of a house of cards these companies have built promising targeted consumers while really just providing random, maybe demographically correct consumers. This tech bubble may well burst when companies get hard evidence that they have been getting fleeced by big data.

The creepiness of the data gathering and poor security of the gathered data are another subject which has been, and will be, discussed a lot. But what about the business model? Are you getting fed appropriate ads (if you see any)? Have you bought ads? What promises and premises did they make? Do you think this has the look of an over-promised scheme?

What do you think?
Current victims:
Mint 20 Cinnamon on an HP 505B AMD Athlon II x4 645 / 3.1 Ghz w/ 8 GB Ram

Mint 19 Mate on a Dell Latitude D830 Intel Core 2 Duo T7250 / 2 GHz w/ 4 GB Ram

OS Reinstall Counter is set at 5
User avatar
Portreve
Level 10
Level 10
Posts: 3095
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 12:03 am
Location: Florida

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Portreve »

I guess I'm more concerned about privacy matters than just the straight-up marketing part. I'm always chuckling to myself when I see web page-embedded ads because it just seems so obvious. There's ad-solutely (see what I did there?) no subtlety about what they're doing or how. I'm not sure what makes them think they're enticing me.

Actually, the only time I get pissed is on YouTube, because they have become so annoying and intrusive. Also, I'm very pissed that Google allows some of the ads it does, for example The Epic er I mean "Epoch" Times, an outfit so utterly clueless and stupid they don't even know how to pronounce their own name. I'm thinking about posting in a video's comment section any time I see one of those ads that either they complain to Google and have them removed, or I'm not going to watch or support their channel.
Please remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

Running Linux Mint Cinnamon 20.0.

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.
— Voltaire
User avatar
Tater
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2018 9:28 am
Location: PEBCAK

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Tater »

My interest in this, for the moment, is in the "why" end of the thing. The security and privacy implications are well discussed already.

The business reason is to sell product to people. Targeted adverts, theoretically, are more valuable than general screaming at the clouds. But... From what I can see, based on the few ads that leak into my consciousness these days, the advertisements themselves are a mess. It seems that the plan is:

1) Distract the subject.
2) Annoy the subject.
3) Profit?

This doesn't seem like the end result of the millions, if not billions, of dollars that have gone into marketing research and development.

I use Amazon and eBay frequently. I take no special pains to minimize their data capture of my browsing and purchasing. And, yet: All they seem to be able to suggest to me are items that I just bought (usually durable items) and things that I have never, ever, searched for, bought or have any conceivable use for.

I'm a sample size of one. But anecdotally I hear people make similar observations. How much money is being wasted on these "targeted" ads?

As to YouTube, I use Slimjet browser for my YouTube watching. It has built-in YouTube ad blocking and a downloader. I support most of my subscribed channels directly through Patreon. The only time I see ads on YouTube is when I am searching for something using my normal browser (Vivaldi) and look at a video.

I cannot imagine why anyone would subject themselves to four minutes of ads to watch about the same time in content on any subject. Let alone, as is often the case for me, an incoherent DIYer explaining how he changed some part on his vehicle. All I want out of the video is imagery of the part and its' fasteners. :lol: I've found that if you "preview" the video in the search engine it doesn't seem to inject the ads.
Current victims:
Mint 20 Cinnamon on an HP 505B AMD Athlon II x4 645 / 3.1 Ghz w/ 8 GB Ram

Mint 19 Mate on a Dell Latitude D830 Intel Core 2 Duo T7250 / 2 GHz w/ 4 GB Ram

OS Reinstall Counter is set at 5
User avatar
trytip
Level 13
Level 13
Posts: 4782
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 1:20 pm

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by trytip »

i edit: because they take away my power to delete.
Last edited by trytip on Wed May 27, 2020 9:25 am, edited 2 times in total.
Image
User avatar
majpooper
Level 6
Level 6
Posts: 1251
Joined: Thu May 09, 2013 1:56 pm
Location: North Carolina, USA

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by majpooper »

Marketing as it turns out seems in many cases to be counter-intuitive. I took a marketing course in college years ago - granted it was just an introductory survey course but the prof, probably just a graduate assistant, was really good. Turns out he had worked for several years in marketing, a statistician really for the Anheiser Bush the beer people. Some of the stuff he told us especially about we beer drinkers just seemed hard to believe. Marketing people are really just intel people. They may miss around the margins (you are in the 24-35 male demographic that is an avid football fan but you enjoy French wine and cheese soufflé while watching the Raiders vs Cowboys rather than a Bud and pizza) but they know what works. Keep in mind they are playing the percentages - if they can automatically generate an ad to get a few % of the people that just bought running shoes to buy running socks they are making $$$. Also another thing I remember being taught is an ad has more than one purpose. Brand recognition is important - supposedly if they can get the consumer exposed and to remember seven of their ads when it is time to buy a product that they sell you will consider them. So I get the example I just bought tires so why and ad for tires seems dumb . . . . repetition and re-enforcement of their brand to the target demographic.

OK take everything I am saying with a grain of salt - I am being a barracks Marketing expert based on taking Marketing 101 in college over > 20 years ago.
User avatar
Portreve
Level 10
Level 10
Posts: 3095
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 12:03 am
Location: Florida

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Portreve »

majpooper wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 12:45 pm
Marketing as it turns out seems in many cases to be counter-intuitive. I took a marketing course in college years ago - granted it was just an introductory survey course but the prof, probably just a graduate assistant, was really good. Turns out he had worked for several years in marketing, a statistician really for the Anheiser Bush the beer people. Some of the stuff he told us especially about we beer drinkers just seemed hard to believe. Marketing people are really just intel people. They may miss around the margins (you are in the 24-35 male demographic that is an avid football fan but you enjoy French wine and cheese soufflé while watching the Raiders vs Cowboys rather than a Bud and pizza) but they know what works. Keep in mind they are playing the percentages - if they can automatically generate an ad to get a few % of the people that just bought running shoes to buy running socks they are making $$$. Also another thing I remember being taught is an ad has more than one purpose. Brand recognition is important - supposedly if they can get the consumer exposed and to remember seven of their ads when it is time to buy a product that they sell you will consider them. So I get the example I just bought tires so why and ad for tires seems dumb . . . . repetition and re-enforcement of their brand to the target demographic.

OK take everything I am saying with a grain of salt - I am being a barracks Marketing expert based on taking Marketing 101 in college over > 20 years ago.
If you listen to most radio ads these days, you always hear in the tag at the end a triple repeat of the phone number or the web site. Always. Three is a magic number because that's the minimum necessary to get most people to transfer it from short term into long term memory. Mind you, seven to fourteen repeats is used for education-level memorization, so you can see there's a correlation there.
Please remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

Running Linux Mint Cinnamon 20.0.

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.
— Voltaire
ugly
Level 4
Level 4
Posts: 339
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2016 9:17 pm

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by ugly »

Another thing to keep in mind is that we all greatly over-estimate how smart we are, and how resistant to things like advertising we are. These companies advertise and use other manipulative tricks (store layouts are one example) because they work. And I would expect that most people assume these tricks don't work on them.
User avatar
Portreve
Level 10
Level 10
Posts: 3095
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 12:03 am
Location: Florida

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Portreve »

ugly wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 5:52 pm
Another thing to keep in mind is that we all greatly over-estimate how smart we are, and how resistant to things like advertising we are. These companies advertise and use other manipulative tricks (store layouts are one example) because they work. And I would expect that most people assume these tricks don't work on them.
Your comment reminds me of a bit from How To Irritate People (1968) starring John Cleese, Graham Chapman, and Michael Palin.
Please remember to mark your fixed problem [SOLVED].

Running Linux Mint Cinnamon 20.0.

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.
— Voltaire
BuckSkin
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:11 pm

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by BuckSkin »

Tater wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:12 pm
If the primary goal all these companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) is to sell you, as a consumer, to interested third parties, what if you aren't?
What do you think?
Tater,
your entire post hits the nail squarely on the head.

I am a very poor excuse for a consumer; I only ever buy what I need and what "I" want, not what some overzealous advertising agency has in mind for me.
I have seven trucks and the newest is a 1991; I wouldn't have any of this "modern" computer-control electronic crap as a gift; yet, I am bombarded with new vehicle ads; and that with me using ad-blockers and avoiding as much advertising as I can.

I put them in the same boat as telemarketers and telecampaigners; the surest way to lose my vote is for some prerecorded (or live) candidate to interrupt whatever I am doing with a phone call requesting my vote.

The whole "system" wants to stereotype everyone; I go to fill out a form about whatever and there are about half-a-dozen choices to describe me or my situation and not a single one of them comes close.

It has gotten so bad that searching the internet for an answer to something is an effort in futility; the first twenty pages will be ads trying to sell you something vaguely (in the broadest terms) resembling whatever was typed in the search bar; change search engines and get the same twenty-plus pages of ads.

It has gotten ridiculous.
>>>>> Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon 64-bit <<<<<
>>> Virtual Guest on Windows 7 Pro 64-bit Host <<<
>> Network-connected with numerous Windows 7 Machines <<
User avatar
lsemmens
Level 10
Level 10
Posts: 3489
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:07 pm
Location: Rural South Australia

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by lsemmens »

I put them in the same boat as telemarketers and telecampaigners; the surest way to lose my vote is for some prerecorded (or live) candidate to interrupt whatever I am doing with a phone call requesting my vote.
If a live candidate actually did ring me, he might just get my vote. Most of them are too busy "campaigning" to waste time talking to their constituents.
Fully mint Household
Out of my mind - please leave a message
User avatar
AZgl1500
Level 13
Level 13
Posts: 4879
Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2015 3:20 am
Location: Oklahoma where the wind comes sweeping down the plains
Contact:

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by AZgl1500 »

I must be a 'good consumer', if you watch my Email Inbox....

I have to "Unsubscribe" from about every 5th or 10th email that I see daily, and I mark it SPAM at the same time.
Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon
User avatar
Pierre
Level 20
Level 20
Posts: 10599
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:33 am
Location: Perth, AU.

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Pierre »

the "record" so far .. is 96,450 eMails
:shock:

the Guy had 'given' his eMail address to all & sundry business's.
& they all were eMailing their Business's Promotions. . .
:roll:
Image
Please edit your original post title to include [SOLVED] - when your problem is solved!
and DO LOOK at those Unanswered Topics - - you may be able to answer some!.
Lady Fitzgerald
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 530
Joined: Tue Jan 07, 2020 3:12 pm
Location: AZ, SSA (Squabbling States of America)

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Lady Fitzgerald »

BuckSkin wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 9:49 pm
Tater wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 12:12 pm
If the primary goal all these companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) is to sell you, as a consumer, to interested third parties, what if you aren't?
What do you think?
Tater,
your entire post hits the nail squarely on the head.

I am a very poor excuse for a consumer; I only ever buy what I need and what "I" want, not what some overzealous advertising agency has in mind for me.
I have seven trucks and the newest is a 1991; I wouldn't have any of this "modern" computer-control electronic crap as a gift; yet, I am bombarded with new vehicle ads; and that with me using ad-blockers and avoiding as much advertising as I can.

I put them in the same boat as telemarketers and telecampaigners; the surest way to lose my vote is for some prerecorded (or live) candidate to interrupt whatever I am doing with a phone call requesting my vote.

The whole "system" wants to stereotype everyone; I go to fill out a form about whatever and there are about half-a-dozen choices to describe me or my situation and not a single one of them comes close.

It has gotten so bad that searching the internet for an answer to something is an effort in futility; the first twenty pages will be ads trying to sell you something vaguely (in the broadest terms) resembling whatever was typed in the search bar; change search engines and get the same twenty-plus pages of ads.

It has gotten ridiculous.
Wow! You pretty much described me.

You must not be using very good ad blockers. I use the Brave Browser. I ignore their BAT system and just enjoy the almost complete lack of ads. I don't dislike ads themselves--they pay for the website I'm viewing and inform me of new products and services I would otherwise be unaware of. Unfortunately, the trend to use intrusive loud, distracting, distasteful, and otherwise obnoxious ads, ads that block my ability to view a website, and ads that contain malware have forced me to block all ads. I tried whitelisting sites that didn't have obnoxious but that did not work well and was more hassle that it was worth. Until the computer ad industry clean up their act, I will continue to block ads. If a site demands that I enable their ads to be able to view the site, they can just take their site and stuff it; there are other just as good sites I can go to.

I use ads to tell me of new products and services but they do not influence me to buy them. I base my decisions on the merits of the products and services after researching them. Obnoxious ads, on the other hand, will often negatively influence my decision to buy something.

I feel the same way about people calling me, basically demanding I drop whatever I'm doing to pay attention to them. First, it's rude to expect me to do that. Second, it's my phone. I pay for it for my own use, not anyone else's. Telemarketers not only steal my time, they are stealing my phone service so I treat them as the thieves they are.

I've eliminated calls from politicians but, before I did that, I had a policy of not only not voting for that politician, I would let the politician know why s/he lost my vote. First, I replaced my home phone number on my voter registration (I'm an Independent but just meant I got calls from all parties) with a bogus number (a number that will redirect the caller to directory assistance) then later, when it was allowed, I simply did not fill in that blank.

I also ditched my landline and replaced with a cellular "modem" that allows me to use my landline cordless phones with it. Since robocalls to cell phones are banned, that and not registering with one of my phone numbers pretty much eliminated all political calls.

I've eliminated the vast majority of telemarketers calling by avoiding giving out my actual phone number. For businesses that think they "need" my phone number, I give them the aforementioned fake number. I have outgoing Caller ID blocked. I use a mail service to receive my mail to thwart mailbox raiders and porch pirates. That's the address most businesses get, not my home address. I don't mind junk mail because I can choose when to deal with it, unlike a phone call.

Sadly, when a illicit telemarketer calls a number and gets an answer, your number goes onto a list as a live number that is most likely to get answered. My home phone system's caller ID will show a phone number but, unless I have that number in my phone's "phone book", it will not show a name. I screen my calls now. If I get a call from a number that's not in my phone, I ignore it. If it actually is important, they will leave a message. That keeps my number off a "live list" and thwarts the random dialers. Even if a call is from someone legitimate, if I'm busy doing something else, I let the call go to the answering machine and call back later. I own my phones; they do not own me!

My cell phone is a flip phone stays turned off until I'm going to use it. I almost never give that number out, even to friends (it wouldn't do them any good since the phone stays turned off). My phone plan is a pay as you go plan. It costs me $2 for the first call of a day and is free for every call I make or receive the rest of the day. I pay $5/mo (plus $0.45 in fees) to meet the requirement to top off monthly (unused monthly balances roll over for up to a year). If I left the phone turned on, phone spammers would drive my phone bill up to an average of $60.50/month!

I also have run into forms that try to put me in pigeon holes that I do not fit in. I ignore those fields whenever I can. If I can't, give a ridiculous response.

People need to own their personal information and stop making it so easy for others to obtain.

lsemmens wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 5:30 am
I put them in the same boat as telemarketers and telecampaigners; the surest way to lose my vote is for some prerecorded (or live) candidate to interrupt whatever I am doing with a phone call requesting my vote.
If a live candidate actually did ring me, he might just get my vote. Most of them are too busy "campaigning" to waste time talking to their constituents.
Politicians who call me, either live or as a robocall not only lose my vote, I let them know why they lost it. When voting, you do not have to choose one or the other. If a candidate I do not like is running unopposed, s/he will not get my vote.
AZgl1500 wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:54 am
I must be a 'good consumer', if you watch my Email Inbox....

I have to "Unsubscribe" from about every 5th or 10th email that I see daily, and I mark it SPAM at the same time.
Unsubscribing from unsolicited spam usually will get you put on a mailing list that gets sold to other spammers. It's better to just mark it as spam.
Jeannie

Linux Mint Cinnamon 19.3 Cinnamon 64 bit
System 76 Serval WS (serw11) 17" Laptop
User avatar
AZgl1500
Level 13
Level 13
Posts: 4879
Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2015 3:20 am
Location: Oklahoma where the wind comes sweeping down the plains
Contact:

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by AZgl1500 »

Lady Fitzgerald wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 2:40 pm
the trend to use intrusive loud, distracting, distasteful, and otherwise obnoxious ads, ads that block my ability to view a website, and ads that contain malware have forced me to block all ads. I tried whitelisting sites that didn't have obnoxious but that did not work well and was more hassle that it was worth. Until the computer ad industry clean up their act, I will continue to block ads. If a site demands that I enable their ads to be able to view the site, they can just take their site and stuff it; there are other just as good sites I can go to.
AZgl1500 wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 9:54 am
I must be a 'good consumer', if you watch my Email Inbox....

I have to "Unsubscribe" from about every 5th or 10th email that I see daily, and I mark it SPAM at the same time.
Unsubscribing from unsolicited spam usually will get you put on a mailing list that gets sold to other spammers. It's better to just mark it as spam.
Okay,
I will try that, just SPAM them for a while.

Your opinion on the "Stuff and Go" is exactly what I had to do with "Washington Post" newspaper....
They let you see 2 or 3 lines of the header and then put up a Subscription Fee Required.....
well screw that, there are a lot of Alternative News Sources out there, and the easiest, and cleanest one for me is NPR.

NPR's website loads FAST!!! and is fairly unobtrusive with adverts.
Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon
BuckSkin
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:11 pm

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by BuckSkin »

Lady Fitzgerald wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 2:40 pm
Sadly, when a illicit telemarketer calls a number and gets an answer, your number goes onto a list as a live number that is most likely to get answered.
There is a lot of wisdom in your entire post.

That line right there may explain something I have been wondering for years; a dozen times a day, I get calls from weird numbers, most with a 480 area code, I never answer any of them.

However, I also get a lot of calls that look legitimate on the I.D.; but, when I answer, they immediately hang up.

I had been wondering what possible benefit such behavior could be to them; you may very well have shed some light on it = they are making/selling lists of numbers that answered the phone.

I would never answer any such calls, but I do get legitimate calls from people that I definitely want to talk to, many of them having all sorts of weird phone numbers due to so many possible phone services available; most of these people are very wonderful people that are just shy and nervous about leaving messages, so if I want to talk to them, I had better answer --- of course then, nine out of ten times it is not a legitimate call.
I live too far out to have any mail/package drop service; for the porch bandits, I have a nice big weighted UPS box sitting in a chair on the porch beside the door; there is a hidden wire connected to the package bottom that is in turn connected to the trigger of a hidden shotgun; move the package the least little bit and BOOM!

I did the same thing with a five-gallon can that says "Lawn Mower Gas" in big letters.

I have had to reload twice since I started doing this; I need to set up a hidden camera and get their reactions on video.
>>>>> Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon 64-bit <<<<<
>>> Virtual Guest on Windows 7 Pro 64-bit Host <<<
>> Network-connected with numerous Windows 7 Machines <<
User avatar
AZgl1500
Level 13
Level 13
Posts: 4879
Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2015 3:20 am
Location: Oklahoma where the wind comes sweeping down the plains
Contact:

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by AZgl1500 »

I subscribe to Verizon's Caller ID, which is $2 bux a month....
but is a lot more informative than any of the Caller ID Apps that I have tried off of Play.Google.store
none of them are accurate.

Unless I am expecting a doctor to call me, and an Unknown To Me call comes in, I always slide the Ignore button, or just press the Volume Key and let it go to Voice mail.

In the last 5 months, only 2 voice mails have been left, both of which were from people in my Contacts List and I was out of hearing range of the phone.

I have found that every time I do a Reverse Call to the "Unknown Number" it comes up as "That Number is not in service"
Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon
BuckSkin
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:11 pm

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by BuckSkin »

Lady Fitzgerald wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 2:40 pm
My cell phone is a flip phone stays turned off until I'm going to use it. I almost never give that number out, even to friends (it wouldn't do them any good since the phone stays turned off). My phone plan is a pay as you go plan.
I could have typed that, word-for-word, and it would have been describing me exactly.

I have a TracFone; they put a new tax on it and it now costs a little over $23 for 90 days; before that, it was $19.99 + 6% tax.

For that money, I get 140 minutes that must roll over indefinitely as I now have tens of thousands of minutes bought and paid for.
I use it so little that one time I forgot to renew and the 90 days ran out; it had been another 90 days before I thought of it.
I figured that, when I activated the new 90 day card that all of my minutes would be lost; I was pleasantly surprised to find that my minutes were still there.

After that episode, I started a new plan that so far has been working well; before the 90 days expires, I buy a new card, but I don't activate it; I just write the code numbers on a slip of paper, along with my 20-extra minutes code, and put that in the phone case; I don't activate the card until I need to make a call.
Doing thus, I have been saving quite a bit on phone cards; I don't know how far I can press my luck before I lose all of my minutes; but, so far so good.

To put this all in perspective, I often drive an over-the-road truck and may not see the house for three weeks; if I can get along without a phone, anyone can.
>>>>> Linux Mint 19.3 Cinnamon 64-bit <<<<<
>>> Virtual Guest on Windows 7 Pro 64-bit Host <<<
>> Network-connected with numerous Windows 7 Machines <<
Lady Fitzgerald
Level 5
Level 5
Posts: 530
Joined: Tue Jan 07, 2020 3:12 pm
Location: AZ, SSA (Squabbling States of America)

Re: They want consumers. What if you aren't?

Post by Lady Fitzgerald »

BuckSkin wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 5:54 pm
Lady Fitzgerald wrote:
Wed May 27, 2020 2:40 pm
My cell phone is a flip phone stays turned off until I'm going to use it. I almost never give that number out, even to friends (it wouldn't do them any good since the phone stays turned off). My phone plan is a pay as you go plan.
...I often drive an over-the-road truck and may not see the house for three weeks; if I can get along without a phone, anyone can.
Not necessarily. You and I, and I'm sure many others, can do well without being connected to others at the lip 24/7 but many people need phones for their jobs, to keep in touch with relatives (especially parents with their children and children with elderly parents), etc.
Jeannie

Linux Mint Cinnamon 19.3 Cinnamon 64 bit
System 76 Serval WS (serw11) 17" Laptop
Post Reply

Return to “Open chat”