Why do new people give up on Linux?

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jjp2145-oldtimer
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by jjp2145-oldtimer »

I thought I posted my answer before, but I guess I held my tongue.

The reason that new people give up on Linux is that most people are not suited for using Linux. People fall on a weird inverted bellcurve in this regard. The people who can use Linux are the people who can be issued a stable operating system and use it without breaking it, and the people who can figure out how it works. Somewhere between these two points there is a big hole in the ground where most people live.

My observations are not helpful. I don't know what I am trying to measure and I don't know how to measure it. So what traits does a Linux user need to be successful? A high tolerance for frustration when learning to use Linux. The ability to articulate a problem and provide accurate and pertinent information when asking for help. Good judgment when making system changes.

The most important trait for the person who just wants a stable operating system is good judgment. The most important trait for the person who is trying to figure things out is a high tolerance for frustration.

Either there is a large vocal minority, or a distinct skills gap at play here.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by majpooper »

I still think it boils down to "turn key" (you buy it already installed ready to go as is) VS. "DIY" you install it and set it up . . . . and oh - fix any BIOS (huh . . . what's a BIOS), driver etc. issues that may arise.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by RollyShed »

jShumway00 aptly points out a few very basic obstacles that cause new people to give up on linux;
1.) most non-savvy computer users are not even going to know how to burn a bootable .iso USB/DVD.
2.) and if they do get a bootable .iso chances are there will be installation issues. How many of those folks even know what a BIOS is? And if it's a Mac . . . .
3.) and somehow if they get it installed but they have Realtec WiFi or Nvidia driver issues or need to set up a home network or keep getting a black screen or so on and so forth they have no idea where to get support let alone how to even articulate their issue.
(1) Is the thread about those with an already installed system? If so it doesn't apply.
(2) Is the thread about those with an already installed system? If so it doesn't apply.
(3) Is the thread about those with an already installed system? If so it doesn't apply if properly done.

I did a count-up and over the past year (2 years?) 18 systems I've installed, not one of those do the 1, 2, 3, obstacles apply. They haven't given up either so maybe a properly installed system doesn't prove to be a problem.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Barbados99 »

jjp2145-oldtimer wrote:
Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:20 pm
The most important trait for the person who just wants a stable operating system is good judgment. The most important trait for the person who is trying to figure things out is a high tolerance for frustration.
I agree with you. I remember my very first experience with a computer at my place of employment in the 1980's. I nice older guy from I.T. who was helping me passed on a tip that day. He said the #1 advice he could give me was to be patient. Over the 40 years since that day I've thought about that comment many times when I found myself getting frustrated with a computer. It was so true in my journey with computers and technology. I have never found any of this easy. Not with Windows or Linux. But maybe I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer. But if I'm patient then stuff usually ends up okay. I just read and try to follow instructions like I'm following a cooking recipe - step by step. I don't understand why some of this stuff works, but all I really care about is that it does work. But yeah, patience and a high tolerance for frustration helps. It's true for technology and true in life. LOL, I'd rather do a clean install of 10 Linux installations than do my taxes or do any government paperwork for that matter. :)

Thinking back now, I had more frustration with Windows over the years than with Linux. But maybe I was just lucky.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Frank Pereny »

I can give you my perspective as someone who has recently switched to Linux.

I've always been interested in computers and programming a degree. I wouldn't say I am a "power user" at all, but I have been definitely slightly above average on computing skill.

There are a few main issues in my opinion with standard users making a clean switch to Linus as a primary personal OS. They can be summarized as follows:

1) The idea of Linux and a "Distro". Most people don't understand what Linux is. They think it is a singular thing. They are confused by the concept of Linux and different distros and what it means for them, their device and their experience. As a result, they don't even know how to start unless they get pointed in a clear direction kindly by a Linux user suggesting a proper distro for their use case.

2) Stuff working out of the box. Linux mint 20 has been a great experience for me. Everything is working very well out of the box. But in the past that was not my experience with other distros (even old versions of Mint years ago). The WiFi isn't working, keyboard lighting isn't working, etc. Even some relatively benign "bugs" cause the user confusion, and makes them question whether things are working properly at all. Most of the issues can be fixed, but people don't know how to go about doing it (and they think they shouldn't HAVE to do it if this is a quality software)

3) User experience / aesthetics. I will again say my experience with Mint has been fantastic. But in the past this was not the case. Things were confusing, poor tutorials (if available), codecs not being available, and things looking a bit old and clunky. The linux community has traditionally valued function over form, and that totally makes sense in many instances. However, we need to understand human psychology. People don't want the best appliance if it looks like an old clunky device. They are allured by the latest and greatest shapes, curves, colors etc. I'm not saying this is GOOD for the user, but this is reality.

4) Work arounds. I had a linux machine many years ago. I gave it to my wife since it was super small and light for her to take to her school for showing presentations etc. It had a problem with the projector, multiple monitors etc. It had a work around but it was a pain in the butt. Even though I could clearly use it, she didn't want to deal with using terminal and working around what should be a plug in, click and go. I can understand this frustration and myself feel someone embarrassed when explaining the value of Linux and at the same time explaining why I can't simply plug in a monitor and go.

Honorable Mention
5) Games / software. This is an honorable mention because I think 1-4 are 90% of the problem. If they were solved I think most people would be happy browsing, checking mail, and using office 365.

I know this is getting better with Steam on Linux etc. But the stigma is there that games don't / can't run on Linux. Also many proprietary software (CAD, financial, MS Project, etc.) used in industry is not on Linux making the switch impossible for professionals. That being said, I think over time this will slowly go away as apps become more and more web based (we are already seeing it with Office 365, MS Project PWA, etc.). I'm even somewhat hopeful long term streaming services like Stadia type services will be available so gaming on a linux machine with low end hardware is as good or better than a Windows PC.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by t42 »

etc.
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Humor & sacrilege !

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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by h2-1 »

I can't resist, many good comments, but didn't read the entire thread.

I can say a few things, I've been stuck helping windows and osx users fix their issues, which to me is fairly comical because I haven't even seen windows 10 beyond a quick look or two over the years, and the only time I ever see osx is when I'm stuck with the unenviable task of helping someone work through the super shoddy excuse for programming I find the apple corporation puts out to its totally uncritical and abuse accepting fan bois.

So I can tell you why I give up on osx, it's badly written software, extremely unstable, and very hard to get to do even a fraction of what I do without even thinking about it on GNU/Linux. Plus it makes me want to hurl the device across the room every time I interact with apple's stuff. So that may offer a slightly different take on the assumption that the software put out by microsoft or apple is actually that good or robust or stable in the first place.

My second problem with this type of claim is that I've done, or did anyway, windows based networking for a living for a while, at least part of my living, and the notion that windows systems are particular good or fit for purpose implies you've never encountered a hive corruption, a total failure on motherboard replacement, or a host of other issues fairly specific to the entire windows corporate model of computing operating systems.

As I like to tell people when I get stuck fixing their annoying windows or apple problems, thank you for reminding me that no matter how frustrated I may get by some gnu/iinux issue, the alternatives are much worse, so it's worth keeping that in perspective sometimes.

Linus Torvalds once noted quite correctly that all operating systems suck, they just suck in different ways, and gnu/linux sucks a little less than the alternatives. But that again depends on which type of sucking you find worst, that will dictate, or should dictate, your os choice. If you want stuff to be fixable, then windows is a bad choice. If you want robust reliable software written to a very high level for users who are super demanding, then osx is a terrible choice. If you want to have a long term fairly stable api for installing a massive range of free and non free software, then linux is probably a bad choice. And so on.

Speaking for myself, when I first switched more or less full time to a gnu/linux os, I remember a few things quite distinctly, one being that kde 3.5 was everything I had ever wanted windows 2000 to be but it wasn't. Second was opening a 1 MB big text file in a code editor and thinking something had gone wrong because rather than watching the opening little icon bob there for some 60 seconds while windows tried to figure out how to handle such a big job, it was open instantly. So fast that I was sure it had not even opened since I'd never seen anything like that on windows, ever. And that was before the even slower, and cludgier, windows xp, with it's virtually non existent ability to do serious multitasking became mainstream. In fact, for many years afterwards, when I'd start up a friend's system, and later with vista too, I thought it was broken because it was taking so absurdly long to boot

If you've ever done any type of support, you should be aware that windows users give up on windows constantly, it's called if they are tech savvy, reinstalling,, and it not, getting a new computer, because windows has grown so corrupted and rotten. OSX does much better in this regard, being a mutated unix at core, though they go way too far in their walled garden catering to non critical users approach for me to ever contemplate using it. The giving up however of average users isn't recognized at all by many since they are still running windows, they just gave up on their last install, over and over. I don't give up in general on linux installs, but I have given up on many windows installs over the years because experience showed me that once a certain situation or set of situations occurred, it was very unlikely the install could be saved.

With this said, I think there's a HUGE mistake being made fairly continuously by the linux community, which is ignoring the free as in freedom, and open as in open source, nature of the free servers/desktops, whether bsds, linux, whatever, and trying to focus on the free as in beer, and the fantasy that it's a drop in free of cost windows replacement, which it isn't. Which is a good, possibly even a great feature.

I'm trying to find a windows os where I can pick between i3, xfce, or something else, as my desktop, running 4 to 8 virtual desktops natively, no problems, no issues, it all 'just works', where I can take an install, move it to another motherboard, reboot, and tweak a network setting, and it's all ready to go. In other words, this is what I want an operating system to be able to do, and, oddly, it's what the engineers who spend their time, paid or unpaid, to write this software, want their desktops to do. So because they spent the time on their priorities, the desktops do what they want them to do, in a robust, stable, almost comically so at times, way.

It's a strange thing to try to explain to people that yes, really, there is no 'they' out there making a free windows replacement, there is a bunch of people, some working for companies, some for organizations, some for themselves, who are making the stuff work they way they want, and since they spend the time or money to do that, they get first vote on how it works, runs, functions, etc. In other words, gnu linux tends to favor tech oriented people with decent problem solving skills, who can read the f#cking manual, or at least, who won't panic at having to do that now and then.

I could not run my free desktops without at least once a year researching a fix for an upgrade issue, it's usually not a big deal to fix it, and given I worked with windows and am forced to touch macs now and then, I have no illusions about reality, I've seen the failures of windows, and I can guarantee you, when 99% plus of people encounter them, they give up, and either pay someone to try to fix it, or buy a new computer. If you don't know what an event ID is, or that microsoft does not give even come close to reasonably useful documentation on event id error numbers or causes, you also probably don't know which third party sites, like event-id.net, you have to use to try to resolve these thorny internal windows failures and bugs. And even then, you often can't fix a bug that microsoft says was fixed years ago but which isn't fixed. In gnu/linux desktop/servers, the odds are very good you can in fact fix it, and find the solution.

I think by now the split has gotten fairly clear, some 80+% of users basically find windows good enough, or osx so annoying they'd rather have at least some control over their system. Another 10-15% of users want that full corporate walled garden, and will pretend that all the failures and issues they encounter aren't there, and that apple is wonderful. Or are satisfied with the osx pseudo unix, somehow. Then a very small slice of more tech savvy users who want to have powerful robust operating systems that can be maintained over years, call it 2% or so, run straight gnu/linux desktops, or even more rare now, a BSD. Not including the android or other google OS type systems, which are I think designed more like smart phones in general, to be thrown away after a while, while google handles your system.

So this probably very roughly defines the overall end user computing market, it hasn't changed much for a decade, so it seems safe to say we're roughly where we will be.

The guys who write the stuff that runs your desktop prioritize certain things that average computer consumers care less about, and the linux engineers care less about the stuff that normal consumers care more about, so those things don't work, or don't work as well, as they do on the fully corporate non free desktops that pay thousands of programmers to make those things work, at least superficially. That goes back to what matters to you as a user, if what matters most is the feature sets developed by the microsoft or apple corporations, then why are you even trying to use linux in the first place? You have to be clear on what matters to you, then pick the os that fits that most closely, and accept that the others won't be as good a match, and go on with your lives.

I mean, if linus cared deeply about kernel api stability, which the core guys in the linux kernel claim, nonsensically, to care about, then you could quite literally take any driver written in the last 10 years and pop it on the kernel and it would just work. But they don't care about that, they care about stuff working today, and in particular, they care about the stuff that the companies that pay their salaries care about, heavy duty server stuff, so you can rest assured, linux is totally ontop of the latest 100 core ARM servers running pcie nvme drives, but they don't really care if your nvidia driver fails on the newest kernel upgrade, nor do they care if your old printer works.

This is why linux, as the kernel, is so comically and insanely robust and powerful, and why linux runs most of the world's servers now, and I think maybe all of the world's super computers? That's because to engineers, these are interesting problems. gnome sucking and breaking again with gtk 4 is not an interesting problem, nor is it likely to attract the best or brightest developers. So the consumer desktop side of linux works about as well as the core developers want it to work. If you know what to look for, which is good documentation, good code, then you can also find a good desktop or window manager, like i3, because it's written by people who care about that problem and have the skill to execute that caring and maintain it over years.

When I started inxi, I was solving a set of problems I could not readily solve on windows when I was a sys admin, basically a lot of the stuff I put into inxi to this day is for sys admins, but also for end users, since I've been both, I make it cater to its main user, me, and then to set of users who I know and trust. This is how the linux kernel also works as a project in many ways, though their interests are much wider of course since they get paid for the work and cater to the interests of those who pay them, which tends to be server oriented stuff. Server oriented stuff reflects in far greater robustness and stability of the kernel running your desktop, but i don't believe that's the main motivation, the main motivation is to run servers really well. osx gave up completely on that market, and boy does it show, junk code, junk stability, junk robustness. Nobody to keep apple honest anymore now that they are 100% consumer software.

So people give up on linux because it was misrepresented to them, by well meaning people, and they shouldn't have been using it in the first place. Usually because of an upgrade failure, that was a problem I tried to resolve with a core group of people for years, and we almost had the problem licked, but it was a full time job, and then we all moved on, but it was a problem that could with cooperation be solved, never has been though. It's better now than before, but still not that great. One upgrade failure is all it takes most users to give up. Or some windows hardware not working, and them not understanding that if they got the right hardware for linux, their issues would be over, permanently. Or they need to use fancy printers or scanners, and get the wrong ones. Or they want windows but for free.

So my long term view now is, people aren't giving up on linux, they weren't meant to use it in the first place, they discovered that fact, and moved on to what they were or are meant to use, which is totally fine.

It's not a religion where it dies if you don't gain more adherents, taking them from the other competing factions, it's just a bunch of people writing the os they want, the tools they want, the desktops or window managers they want, and if those happen to meet your own wants or needs, then you are indeed in luck!!! But if not, it's not like you paid for it, and have some claim to be able to demand x or y from the developers, what did that person themselves do to make it more the way they wanted? Odds are good they did nothing, and prefer to complain about linux users, because they do not understand that this is FREE/Libre software, and they have no right to complain at all, that's a somewhat disgusting sense of entitlement that I do not fully understand, I mean, yes, sometimes stuff sucks, really bad, and lord knows, I've complained, but to me, if you aren't doing anything other than taking, then your rights to complain are very small.

This is, again, what I view as the biggest mistake free software based distributions make, not making it clear to their users that you cannot compare corporate run non free systems like windows or osx with free software, because it's apples to oranges, you can compare non free with non free (osx vs windows), or free with free (like comparing reactos with gnu/linux with freebsd), and work to make free more the way you want it to be, but for instance, take me, if someone asks me to do something really dumb with inxi that I don't care about, why should I do it? they aren't paying me, I think it's a dumb idea, so why on earth should they believe they have a right to demand my time for free like that? Total confusion, sigh. Focus on free as in freedom is my advice, focus on making the stuff you like as good as you can make it, focus on the problems you can solve, if it's support, give the best support if it's code, give the best code.

If the coders aren't out there willing to solve a problem then that problem is not important to them, and that's how it is. Coding in the real world is worth maybe $100 an hour and up, contemplate that next time you reflect on why something on a consumer gnu/linux desktop isn't working perfectly, whose job is it to fix it? why should they, particularly if it's an annoying and not fun problem in the first place? Since engineers have a much greater role in determining the BSDs, Linuxes, etc, futures and features, those operating systems and tools are going to reflect what matters to them more than what matters to an average windows or osx user, and there's very little point in trying to whitewash that fact. I don't have queues of people lined up offering me inxi patches, so if I don't do something in it, it's unlikely to get done, and that's how it is.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by David Chiang »

h2-1 wrote:
Fri Jan 29, 2021 11:47 pm
I can't resist, many good comments, but didn't read the entire thread.
And now you expect everyone to read your novel here?! :roll: I couldn't resist either, so I skipped your entry! :twisted:
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by t42 »

It is very interesting opinion on the subject, thank you!
h2-1 wrote:
Fri Jan 29, 2021 11:47 pm
The giving up however of average users isn't recognized at all by many since they are still running windows, they just gave up on their last install, over and over. I don't give up in general on linux installs, but I have given up on many windows installs over the years because experience showed me that once a certain situation or set of situations occurred, it was very unlikely the install could be saved.
Alas Linux persistence is rarely acknowledged. I personally never ended up being unable to recover Linux badly messed up installation yet.
h2-1 wrote:
Fri Jan 29, 2021 11:47 pm
I'm trying to find a windows os where I can pick between i3, xfce, or something else, as my desktop, running 4 to 8 virtual desktops natively, no problems, no issues, it all 'just works', where I can take an install, move it to another motherboard, reboot, and tweak a network setting, and it's all ready to go.
I treasure this inherent Linux portability and nice to see someone mentioned it here.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by majpooper »

David Chiang wrote:
Sat Jan 30, 2021 6:44 am
h2-1 wrote:
Fri Jan 29, 2021 11:47 pm
I can't resist, many good comments, but didn't read the entire thread.
And now you expect everyone to read your novel here?! :roll: I couldn't resist either, so I skipped your entry! :twisted:
Well maybe you should go back and read h2-1's entire post because it makes a lot of good points. I have been following/reading this entire thread from the very beginning and it is quite like "beating a dead horse" to be honest - the same things over and over and over and over and over. At least h2-1 gives a different perspective, one from a developers point of view which has been missing.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by MurphCID »

h2-1 wrote:
Fri Jan 29, 2021 11:47 pm
I can't resist, many good comments, but didn't read the entire thread.
I cannot disagree. But we as a general rule (this forum is the exception) are a pretty unwelcoming bunch.
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Krinkle »

i first installed Linux Mint 13, and although it had it's issues, it was still by far better than anything Windows....eventually even dropping the Windows partition, which was a proud moment.....i've never given up on Linux nor will i ever....i just wanna learn more....i want to be a master in the art of linux....i feel like i know some things but in reality, i also feel like i know nothing....the only thing i might have a leg up on is familiarity...just because what ive seen, working with mint 13 to 20, not that i really know how or why things are working the way they do

i just wanna learn - where is the best place that i can learn more?
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Barbados99 »

Krinkle wrote:
Tue Feb 09, 2021 1:05 pm
i first installed Linux Mint 13, and although it had it's issues, it was still by far better than anything Windows....eventually even dropping the Windows partition, which was a proud moment.....i've never given up on Linux nor will i ever....i just wanna learn more....i want to be a master in the art of linux....i feel like i know some things but in reality, i also feel like i know nothing....the only thing i might have a leg up on is familiarity...just because what ive seen, working with mint 13 to 20, not that i really know how or why things are working the way they do

i just wanna learn - where is the best place that i can learn more?
I felt exactly the same way. I had used Linux for years but never learned anything beyond getting my day-to-day stuff done. If something broke, then I'd come here to this forum and with help I'd get a problem fixed, but I never really understood what I was doing. I was just typing in meaningless stuff to fix a problem. I felt about as intelligent as a monkey, just doing stuff until I got my reward of a fixed system instead of a banana. I didn't want to be an expert but just wanted to understand more about Linux and how and why things work.

I signed up for some free on line classes. The Linux Foundation offers some good ones. And I even paid to take some classes at Udemy. My experience was that some of the things in these classes I already knew about, but I learned a lot due to the fact there were many missing pieces in my Linux knowledge & the classes helped me catch up in these areas. You may enjoy doing this too.

I learned a lot on this forum, by just spending time reading various problems and solutions. But without the on line classes there would have always been significant gaps in my knowledge. But between the classes and this forum I feel like I understand more now. Not as an I.T. guy but just as a user who has a foundation knowledge of it all (basic stuff). LOL, I'm at least a tiny bit above the monkey stage working for bananas. Good luck!
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Krinkle »

Barbados99 wrote:
Tue Feb 09, 2021 1:56 pm
Krinkle wrote:
Tue Feb 09, 2021 1:05 pm
i first installed Linux Mint 13, and although it had it's issues, it was still by far better than anything Windows....eventually even dropping the Windows partition, which was a proud moment.....i've never given up on Linux nor will i ever....i just wanna learn more....i want to be a master in the art of linux....i feel like i know some things but in reality, i also feel like i know nothing....the only thing i might have a leg up on is familiarity...just because what ive seen, working with mint 13 to 20, not that i really know how or why things are working the way they do

i just wanna learn - where is the best place that i can learn more?
I felt exactly the same way. I had used Linux for years but never learned anything beyond getting my day-to-day stuff done. If something broke, then I'd come here to this forum and with help I'd get a problem fixed, but I never really understood what I was doing. I was just typing in meaningless stuff to fix a problem. I felt about as intelligent as a monkey, just doing stuff until I got my reward of a fixed system instead of a banana. I didn't want to be an expert but just wanted to understand more about Linux and how and why things work.

I signed up for some free on line classes. The Linux Foundation offers some good ones. And I even paid to take some classes at Udemy. My experience was that some of the things in these classes I already knew about, but I learned a lot due to the fact there were many missing pieces in my Linux knowledge & the classes helped me catch up in these areas. You may enjoy doing this too.

I learned a lot on this forum, by just spending time reading various problems and solutions. But without the on line classes there would have always been significant gaps in my knowledge. But between the classes and this forum I feel like I understand more now. Not as an I.T. guy but just as a user who has a foundation knowledge of it all (basic stuff). LOL, I'm at least a tiny bit above the monkey stage working for bananas. Good luck!
HA! so you know exactly what i'm talking about....because that's exactly how i feel lol - thanks - im on linuxjourney.com and seeming to understand that the best so far after checking out a few other sites....im ok with paying for an online class too as long as it doesn't break the bank - but thanks again!
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Barbados99 »

Krinkle wrote:
Tue Feb 09, 2021 2:11 pm
HA! so you know exactly what i'm talking about....because that's exactly how i feel lol - thanks - im on linuxjourney.com and seeming to understand that the best so far after checking out a few other sites....im ok with paying for an online class too as long as it doesn't break the bank - but thanks again!
I just remembered one other experience helped me learn more about Linux. I set up an Arch Linux system and after that a Gentoo system. Not to use them as my daily driver but just for the learning experience. It required an effort to plan and execute the building of these two systems. Since my Linux knowledge was pretty basic, I found the learning curve pretty steep. But I did learn a lot in the process. LOL, there were moments when I about lost my mind too, but I did push through those problems. The Arch Linux documentation was a gold mine of information, but their forum was nothing like this one... they were not very patient and pretty salty. So basically I was on my own learning and building because it wasn't worth going to that forum for help. It did make me appreciate this Mint forum more than ever. This place is pretty special. Good people here.
Last edited by Moem on Tue Feb 09, 2021 2:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Trimmed a quote. No need to always quote everything that someone else posted. Please be selective.
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majpooper
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by majpooper »

I bit the bullet and signed up for a linux class at the local Community College. it was a good introduction and got ,e started with SuSE. The only thing I found was that it covered a lot of ground and we only did tasks once with little repetition and re-enforcement so a lot of things a learned did not "stick." But it still helps when someone starts talking about an issue or provides instruction at least I have a basic idea what they are talking about . . . . at least some of the time.
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Krinkle
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by Krinkle »

Barbados99 wrote:
Tue Feb 09, 2021 2:28 pm


I just remembered one other experience helped me learn more about Linux. I set up an Arch Linux system and after that a Gentoo system. Not to use them as my daily driver but just for the learning experience. It required an effort to plan and execute the building of these two systems. Since my Linux knowledge was pretty basic, I found the learning curve pretty steep. But I did learn a lot in the process. LOL, there were moments when I about lost my mind too, but I did push through those problems. The Arch Linux documentation was a gold mine of information, but their forum was nothing like this one... they were not very patient and pretty salty. So basically I was on my own learning and building because it wasn't worth going to that forum for help. It did make me appreciate this Mint forum more than ever. This place is pretty special. Good people here.
Good idea! Thanks again for the tips
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DraganTheMighty
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by DraganTheMighty »

People no longer give up on linux.
It's just unfair competition. Windows come preinstalled.
Installing an os it's what people give up. Installing and configuring an os, windows or linux, it's not easy. Linux has the potential to make it easy, but we are not there yet for all the hardware.
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pilotbob42
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Re: Why do new people give up on Linux?

Post by pilotbob42 »

As much as I love Linux, there is still a pretty fundamental problem with hardware support. I know most people won't want to hear this as Linux hardware support has improved by leaps and bounds over the last decade and works 99% of the time, but that last 1% still matters. If you're not a technophile, it doesn't matter if 99% of what you have is supported. You need 100%, period.

On most systems that I've installed Linux on, I've found long standing kernel and/or driver bugs that the average user would have had no chance of solving or working around. A few examples: A Baytrail bug that causes random system freezes when moving in and out of the C6 state. An HP desktop that was "hardware certified" by Ubuntu, but relies on the buggy tg3 driver that causes networking to die if you actually use it at a full 1gbps. A Braswell system with horrible mouse artifacts that start every time the cursor simply touches the left hand side of the screen. An Nvidia Optimus system that won't even boot without "nomodeset" as a kernel parameter because of an ACPI bug (it works the way Windows wants and not the way the ACPI spec is written). The list goes on...

Most of these can be worked around, others can't even to this day. The bugs above have been identified for years and years, but never fixed. Mostly because it isn't what the developers want to work on (which is fair they are mostly volunteers). One can even make valid arguments as to who's really at fault (especially in the Nvidia Optimus example), but the net effect is still the same. Your average Windows user has no chance of resolving any of these problems. They encounter something like this on their first install and they simply give up. They don't want this as a "hobby" they just want it to work.
Last edited by pilotbob42 on Mon Feb 22, 2021 9:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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