The definitive dual-booting guide

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sunyata
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by sunyata »

Husse,

Thanks for your prompt answer. Problem was I didn't fully understand atlef's instructions. Then I poked around and finally got it. Luckily the laptop did not crash. Now that I finally got this right, I will dual boot Mint on the new Samsung NC10 netbook that I bought 2 days ago.

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atlef
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by atlef »

Sorry about that, forgot to tell you that grub starts to count the entries in the list from 0. And I only have 4 entries, so mine is #3.
Good to see you got it working.

atlef.

sudharma
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by sudharma »

May be I am Stupid . Please help with me. I am new to this OS.>

I have a deskto PC with 3 Hard Disks. Configured as:-
Sata "0" 80Gb (ubunto was on this)
Sata "1" 80Gb (Win-Xp on This)
IDE 1 (Master)160Gb. (data) & DVD Drive ( Slave).
Selecting Sata "0" or Sata "1" in the Bios boot preferance to boot Windows or Ubuntu and both the system worked ok.

I downloaded Linux Mint-7 a couple of days ago and installed on Sata "0" disk ( used the whole disk).

My problem is:-
When I start the Pc, I get the Dual Boot Linux screen with the 4 options, namely:-
Linux Mint - generic
Linux Mint (Recovery)
Mem Test
Other OS:-Win-XP

when selecting Windows OS it Loads and runs fine.
But selecting any of the Linux system, the system stops and I get the following message.:
":ERROR - 17: Cannot mount selected partition"
"Press any key to continue.
Pressing any key gives the same message again and again.

When I disconnect the Sata"1" & IDE Hard disk and reboot , the Linux Mint loads and runs OK.
How do I rectify this problem.

Previous Ubuntu Installation was working without any problem in the same configuration.
Last edited by sudharma on Fri Aug 21, 2009 6:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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atlef
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by atlef »

Check this Mint Wiki entry, and see if that can get you back on track.

atlef.

Varg
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by Varg »

I had the same problem. I solved it by editing the menu.lst file, as the wiki says but not in the same way. I have two hard drive: sda and sdb. Grub names them (hd0) and (hd1), only sda = (hd1) and sdb = (hd0), which is against my logic :D

So when you boot up and get the error 17, by pressing any key you go to an other boot menu. There you can edit the drive or partition to boot from by pressing "e". I changed hd(1) to hd(0) for the Linux Mint boot, then "b" and my system booted up. you can try out different combinations if it doesn't work out the first time. When you can boot succesfully, edit the menu.lst file with the correct hd(x) value. This did the trick for me without making use of UUID. However, when your kernel updates, you have to edit the menu.lst file again.

There are other post about this in more detail on this forum, but I can't find the one where I'm looking for.
The ingredients for a Mojito: white rum, sugar, lime, sparkling water, ice and Mint

sudharma
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by sudharma »

Thanks for the prompt reply. As instructed in the Mint Wiki. I booted from the Mint CD and checked the "grub". noted down everything and restarted the PC. The PC started normally and booted into "Linux Mint". Now I am able to Dual- boot into Linux and Windows without any problem. The problem seems to have resolved somehow.
Thanks for the help..

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Fred
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by Fred »

Varg wrote:
However, when your kernel updates, you have to edit the menu.lst file again.
When you edited the menu.lst you should have also changed the groot value. Up in the menu.lst there is a line that says:

# groot=(hd0,1)
change that to:
#groot=(hd0,0)
if that is the change you made in the boot line. groot and the boot line should match for the update to not trash your change.

Fred
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catilley
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by catilley »

I have dual boot on my laptop (windows 2000 pro and Linux Mint (Gloria), and I thought that was hard. I didn't know dual booting got this serious. Would a virtual machine be better?

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Lolo Uila
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by Lolo Uila »

Dual booting isn't necessarily hard. You just have to understand how to use certain files.

The main files that tend be the problem (and solution) for dual boot issues are:
/boot/grub/menu.lst
/etc/fstab
/etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume

and sometimes:
/boot/grub/device.map

The problem arises when you either change your hard drive configuration, or you have mixed IDE & SATA and the OS and BIOS have the drives sorted in different orders (BIOS says SATA is 1st, but OS sees IDE 1st or visa-versa). Throw a RAID controller (or 2) into the mix and things can get a little tricky. Add some removable drive trays and it can really get messy.

One way to minimise trouble, at least for Linux, is to use UUID for drive references. In most cases I feel that UUID can actually cause more problems than it solves, so for systems with simple HDD configurations (all IDE or all SATA) I usually replace UUID with /dev names. But for those complex mixed systems, using UUID will (or should) pretty much always let you boot Linux, regardless of changes to other drives in the system.

In order to properly use UUID you have to edit the following files:
/boot/grub/menu.lst
/etc/fstab
/etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume

Find the UUID of your important drives.

Code: Select all

sudo blkid
With mixed IDE, SATA and 2 RAID arrays (not to mention, 2 removable trays), mine looks like this:

Code: Select all

/dev/sda1: UUID="66da8aff-0e30-4368-a937-11216d5f0f8e" TYPE="ext3" 
/dev/sda5: UUID="c3d7f578-3d20-4922-b0ac-360c78928468" TYPE="ext4" 
/dev/sda6: UUID="e3f0e690-57e9-4494-b78e-64c0287e184c" TYPE="ext2" 
/dev/sda7: UUID="460e903c-bb5d-4588-b2eb-3694e11f1159" TYPE="ext4" 
/dev/sda8: TYPE="swap" UUID="78f5974f-939f-404b-aac5-e35523b4631c" 
/dev/sdb1: UUID="8C585C10585BF802" LABEL="WINDOWS7" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sdb5: UUID="1B68BE47A4A61C40" LABEL="DATA" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/sde1: UUID="15AE99DE50201571" LABEL="RAID300" TYPE="ntfs" 
/dev/mapper/isw_caddchdfa_RAID_Volume1: UUID="690CEA0958074AA7" LABEL="RAID600" TYPE="ntfs" 
My system originally did not have a UUID for my swap partition (not sure why), so I had turn swap off and reformat the swap partition to give it one. Anyway... my Linux boot drive is /dev/sda1 (or sdb1 depending on which trays are installed) so in order to ensure I can always boot into Linux I had to edit the files I listed above and replace all references to /dev/sda1 with UUID=66da8aff-0e30-4368-a937-11216d5f0f8e. Now, if I pull or replace my removable tray, or mess with one of the RAID arrays, Linux will still boot.

In the "/etc/fstab" file you also have to replace all other /dev/ references with their repective UUID names.

Code: Select all

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'vol_id --uuid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
# / was on /dev/sdb1 during installation
UUID=66da8aff-0e30-4368-a937-11216d5f0f8e /               ext3    relatime,errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /home was on /dev/sdb5 during installation
UUID=c3d7f578-3d20-4922-b0ac-360c78928468 /home           ext4    relatime        0       2
# /tmp was on /dev/sdb6 during installation
UUID=e3f0e690-57e9-4494-b78e-64c0287e184c /tmp            ext2    relatime        0       2
# /var was on /dev/sdb7 during installation
UUID=460e903c-bb5d-4588-b2eb-3694e11f1159 /var            ext4    relatime        0       2
# swap was on /dev/sdb8 during installation
UUID=78f5974f-939f-404b-aac5-e35523b4631c none            swap    sw              0       0
/dev/scd0       /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0
# dev/fd0       /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0
And after editing the "/etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume" file you will have to execute

Code: Select all

sudo update-initramfs -u
to update the system.

Fixing the Windows boot after changing my drive arrangement usually involves editing the /boot/grub/menu.lst file. However, you can also hit ESCape at the grub boot menu, then hit "e" to edit the boot options for a temporary solution to boot into Windows. The relevant part of my menu.lst file is below.

Code: Select all

### END DEBIAN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST

title		Windows 7 Ultimate RC1
root		(hd3,0)
map		(hd0) (hd3)
map		(hd3) (hd0)
chainloader	+1
makeactive
With both trays installed Windows thinks it's on (hd3,0). If I remove one tray (or turn off an array) then it thinks it's on (hd2,0), etc.

For a (non-permanent) quick fix Windows boot, hit ESCape from the grub boot menu. Select the Windows boot line, then hit "e" to edit the options. Hit "e" for each line and change the (hd?,?) reference as needed, then hit "b" to boot. TIP: You can use this to test which numbers need to be changed. Once you get Windows to boot correctly, you can boot into Linux and edit the "/boot/grub/menu.lst" file for a more permanent fix.

The problem with using UUID is if you replace your Linux drive, say to upgrade to a larger HDD, which will them have different UUIDs from the previous drive. If you backup from the old drive and restore to the new drive the system will not boot since it will still be looking for the old drive's UUIDs. So after the restore you will have to edit those 3 files again with the new drive's UUID data (use a Live CD and mount the root partition to do this).

This is all much easier than I probably made it look. It's one of those things you just need to do once, and then you will understand it and it will be easy. The main thing to remember is to update ALL references in the "/boot/grub/menu.lst" file (don't forget the one up near the middle of the file that starts with "# kopt=root="). And once you have updated the "/etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume" file you have to sudo update-initramfs -u (this must be done from your booted Linux OS, not from a Live CD).

Of course, the simplest solution is to just never mess with your drive configurations, but for those of us with more complicated needs, editing those 3 files with the UUID labels will assure you can always boot into Linux.

breaker
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by breaker »

You can use labels instead of UUID too.
rtfm - read the fine manual...
Boot info script: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1291280
grub2 https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2
PC-BIOS based booting, mbr, boot records; http://thestarman.pcministry.com/

Brian49
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by Brian49 »

Would someone very kindly point me to guidance on dual-booting Helena and Gloria, please? A user has reported elsewhere on these forums that they've been able to get this working. This seems a bit mysterious to me, what with Helena using grub2 and Gloria grub1. I want to keep Helena as my default since it's better overall, but I've irretrievably lost a couple of things I used to have in Gloria (ability to print from my HP1018, and digital audio output). Many thanks.

pc10pc
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by pc10pc »

i wonder if anyone can comment on my situation
my laptop has a C partition and a D partition, both ntfs and windows vista on C (C/120Gb D/30GB) The D partition is named recovery and has a bunch of files on it.

I'd like to dual boot with mint on the D drive, but i have a few questions. Firstly, are the windows recovery files purely to restore the preinstalled software, or are they required to reinstall vista should anything go wrong? I'd back these up to an external drive.

Secondly, the dual boot guides i have read all deal with installing on a single partition. What is the process for installing on a pre partitioned disc? do i have to delete the D partition using windows, leaving unallocated space for mint?

any help is appreciated, i feel i have about 90% understanding... but the remaining 10% is gnawing away at me!

mahutchinson
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by mahutchinson »

I have just installed Mint again after a while not using it, dual booting with Windows 7. Afterwards I reinstalled the Windows MBR and now the PC only boots into Windows. I want it to dual boot with Windows as default but can't remember how to do this. I tried looking for the menu.1st in Mint but can't find it anywhere even through a search of the whole root partition. Does it have a different name or is it wiped by Windows ?
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breaker
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by breaker »

You all need to make new threads instead of posting help questions in this one. You will get faster and better help that way. Thanks :wink:
rtfm - read the fine manual...
Boot info script: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1291280
grub2 https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2
PC-BIOS based booting, mbr, boot records; http://thestarman.pcministry.com/

spnoe
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by spnoe »

sunyata wrote:Question: How to default startup with Windows XP in dual boot with Mint

I have Windows XP Home on my laptop and have dual boot with Linux Mint. Everytime when I startup, it will default to open Linux on the menu and if I don't quickly select XP within a few seconds, it will automatically startup Linux. As my work requires me to open up XP first, how can I make the startup to default at XP?

Can someone please show me how to make it automatically default to open XP, and only start Linux when I choose to:

Thank you for any assistance you can offer.
Sunyata. I have used GrubED to change bootup OS. It is easy to use and is a small download. Here is a link;
http://linux.softpedia.com/get/System/S ... 4505.shtml

Best wishes, Steve

macrylinda1
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by macrylinda1 »

olik wrote:Has anyone experience with this one http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk
it can manage linux swap 1 and 2 and it can "Rebuild NTFS boot sector
"
or this one http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec
"PhotoRec ignores the filesystem and goes after the underlying data,
so it will still work even if your media's filesystem has been
severely damaged or re-formatted."

Could that work for me?

If so should I run that software via windows or via Linux mint (which still uses that swap, so I assume windows would be better, no?
Thanks again for every help
oli
I have used TestDisk/PhotoRec with great success. But you would need to run it from a LiveCD, such as PartedMagic LiveCD.
And make sure you have enough space to recover the files.

procopio
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by procopio »

Does having 2 operating system can slower a PC in loading files? I've heard that it is ok to have 2 operating system but I'm curios about the speed. what are the steps on having 2 operating system? Thanks to those who will reply> :D

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leejosepho
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by leejosepho »

procopio wrote:Does having 2 operating system can slower a PC in loading files?
No. One system might run faster or slower than the other, but one system will not affect the speed of the other.
procopio wrote:what are the steps on having 2 operating system?
That can depend upon what systems you have in mind. I have Windows 98, 2K, XP, 7 and Mint 9 on this machine, and I installed Windows first and then added Mint.

What operating systems are you thinking about having?

Baddcog
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Re: The definitive dual-booting guide

Post by Baddcog »

OK, I decided to try Mint 9.

I made the liveCD, did instal, but i didn't want it on my already cramped C: drive (only have 4 gigs anyway) but I wanted it on same disc, different partition. I got it installed through the loader and changed partitions to swap and FX3 (or whatever it is).

I guess this makes the dual boot option not available but that's what I want. So I have Win7 Pro 64 on C: and Mint9 on dev/sbb 3 (I think). Anyway, I can see the Linux partition if I boot with CD but I can't get Linux to actually boot (and can't see that partition in Win7.

Of course you can't easily resize the OS disc in Win7, you have to buy 3rd party stuff.

And the post above points to grub ed, but that looks like it needs run IN Linux, but I can't boot :(

Any ideas how I can get the ddual boot to run with the instals I already have FROM Win7?

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