How to make Adobe support Linux

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Exodus_life
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by Exodus_life » Tue Nov 04, 2014 3:05 am

well i have not been to impressed or excited about anything aobe since i found out about their "super cookies" ..at one point they were relatively hard to remove but FF add on "better privacy" solved that


before i discovered VLC player,when ever i came across anything that was proprietary to a mac,,i would just pass right over it

thats what i intend to do when flash becomes too out dated for linux

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MtnDewManiac
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by MtnDewManiac » Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:15 am

all41 wrote:
Get Ready for Activism, Occupy Style
That will scare them for sure!

Like a flea climbing an elephant with rape on his mind.
I haven't laughed that hard in... years, actually.

Regards,
MDM

PS OP, It's probably been stated a few times already (I only got to the above post and will have to clean the coffee I spewed off of the laptop screen before reading further :lol: ), but instead of going with a strategy that will probably do little if anything (other than to possibly get someone annoyed enough to add a routine to filter out posts/accounts which mention linux :roll: ), why not just send them a letter - real, physical, "snail mail" tends to work best, still, and I suppose you could search for a senior-level contact to address the letter to and use the "signature required, return receipt requested" option via USPS - stating that you would have purchased x # of Adobe products, but are unable to due to their lack of linux support and, furthermore, you will not be using any of their products (paid or free) in Microsoft/Apple OS unless/until they decide to develop for your OS. If you want to be an activist, campaign at linux forums and in person in your community to get others to do the same. Additionally, you can work in your community to get others to actually switch to linux; your public library will probably allow you to reserve one of their rooms for this purpose for free and they'll put your "activity" on their regular calendar of events, and you can advertise both on websites like Craigslist and physically by printing up fliers (et cetera). Just remember, while it's important for reasons such as your issue to get people to start using linux, it's equally important to get them to then STOP using Microsoft's and/or Apple's OS. Otherwise, many (most?) people would just dual-boot and run the other OS whenever they wish to use an application which is only available in it. While I have nothing against people who do that (I dual-booted for a while, myself, originally), they don't really have any significance where developers are concerned because said developers are still able to "reach" them via the alternate OS. IDK how many people... Say (just picking numbers more-or-less at random) that there are 300 million people in the USA. If 200 million of them use computers, and 92% of them use a Microsoft or Apple OS, that 8% of "other" OS, while not insignificant in gross number, sort of pales in comparison to the other 1,840,000 people, lol. They probably don't care whether or not those 1.84 million folks also use linux, because it's sort of irrelevant. Now... If we could not only increase the number of people who use *nix, but in the process drop that 1.84 million number down by half a million people or so, well... Again, I just picked those numbers out of the air.

Supporting alternative software is probably the easier thing to do when there are alternatives, but this is an imperfect solution - sooner or later one tends to find a situation where there either is no alternative, or it does not meet that user's specific needs as much as the products available for Microsoft/Apple OS do. Methinks that part of that reason is that the vast majority of developers writing for *nix OS are doing so on a voluntary basis. Supporting commercial software development for linux (etc.) is likely to be an important step, also.

Regards,
MDM
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InkKnife
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by InkKnife » Sat Nov 08, 2014 11:34 pm

Unfortunately, until projects like the GIMP and others put on their big boy paints and support CMYK color separations it will always be amateur hour for Linux graphics.
I have tested every Linux PDF tool I can find and not one supports CMYK which makes them basically useless.
If Linux graphics projects would start offering professional features we would not have to worry about Adobe.
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MtnDewManiac
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by MtnDewManiac » Sun Nov 09, 2014 1:29 am

InkKnife wrote:Unfortunately, until projects like the GIMP and others put on their big boy paints and support CMYK color separations
I thought that's what the Separate+ plug-in (for GIMP) was for.

Scribus doesn't support things like that? Seems like the print shops use CYMK, don't they?

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MDM
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BenTrabetere
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by BenTrabetere » Sun Nov 09, 2014 11:35 am

InkKnife wrote:Unfortunately, until projects like the GIMP and others put on their big boy paints and support CMYK color separations it will always be amateur hour for Linux graphics.
The one thing that keeps Gimp in amateur hour for me is not being able to edit 16-bit images. I am willing to learn a new interface and develop a new workflow, but not if I will be limited to editing RAW images only in RGB/8.

It would be nice if CMYK separation was a built-in feature for Gimp, but everything I've read indicates the Separate+ plug-in adequately satisfies the need. More people will benefit from support for 16-bit editing.

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MtnDewManiac
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by MtnDewManiac » Sun Nov 09, 2014 12:31 pm

You mean this?
GimpUsers wrote:A huge step for GIMP: 16/32 bit per channel support

From now on, you’ll be able to work with a lot more color information and detail in your pictures. This support basically gives you the ability to create super-smooth color transitions on your picture. And theoretically, from now on it’s possible to have RAW files edited with GIMP directly since there is enough color space to bring back all the details that are stored inside a RAW file – however this is not yet implemented yet.

This feature was already shown in May 2012 on Libre Graphics Meeting in Vienna, right after the release of GIMP 2.8. There has been much work done since then below the surface. GIMP 2.10 will be able to work with:

16 bits per color channel – fixed integer
16 bpcc – floating point
32 bpcc – fixed integer
32 bpcc – floating point and of course
8 bpcc integer

If you wonder what the difference is between integer and floating point (in the graphics area): If you have an image with 16-bit integer precision per channel, then you have 65.536 shades of different red, green and blue color tones – all of them equally stepped to each other (equal color distance). If you have it in floating point, then there are no equal-wide steps – so you can distribute the possible color values over selected ranges. For example: if you know that you have a very dark image with many shades of dark red color tones then you would benefit from floating point because you can decrease the importance of the brighter color tones and get most color detail out of only the darker reds.
IDK if it's in the 2.9(?) unstable nightly builds or not. Actually, I'm not sure whether those are even available for linux, all I saw "at a glance" appeared to be for Microsoft OS at

Code: Select all

http://nightly.darkrefraction.com/gimp/
This link also mentions 16- and 32-bit files:

Code: Select all

http://www.pcworld.com/article/255081/six_good_reasons_to_try_gimp_2_8.html
Regards,
MDM
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by colyn » Sun Nov 09, 2014 12:55 pm

InkKnife wrote:Unfortunately, until projects like the GIMP and others put on their big boy paints and support CMYK color separations it will always be amateur hour for Linux graphics.
I have tested every Linux PDF tool I can find and not one supports CMYK which makes them basically useless.
If Linux graphics projects would start offering professional features we would not have to worry about Adobe.
Have you tried Cinepaint??

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InkKnife
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by InkKnife » Sun Nov 09, 2014 2:07 pm

colyn wrote:
InkKnife wrote:Unfortunately, until projects like the GIMP and others put on their big boy paints and support CMYK color separations it will always be amateur hour for Linux graphics.
I have tested every Linux PDF tool I can find and not one supports CMYK which makes them basically useless.
If Linux graphics projects would start offering professional features we would not have to worry about Adobe.
Have you tried Cinepaint??
I will look into Cinepaint.
In addition to CMYK is the way Adobe's stuff is an integrated suit instead of a divergent collection of apps from different sources. Automation is better. Sure, you can script GIMP if you are a programmer but Adobe lets you record actions and save them which is about a million times more useful.
When I switched to Linux one of the first things I did was register at the GIMP forums and after awhile of watching the discussions there I have no idea who the GIMP devs are targeting. Their stance is that if you don't care for the way GIMP does something you should just sod off because, apparently, if you have suggestions you are not in their target audience. The arguments over their move to the new (utterly insane and counter-productive) save routine demonstrated in spades that they are not the least interested in informed input from experienced graphics professionals.
The GIMP devs are by far the most hostile FOSS project I have run into using Linux. I have very little hope of them ever becoming anything like a photoshop replacement.
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BenTrabetere
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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by BenTrabetere » Mon Nov 10, 2014 3:49 am

MtnDewManiac wrote:You mean this?
-snip-
Yep. Did you notice the GimpUsers post was from May 2012, and that the feature won't be available until v2.10? It's 2-years later and it's still in the v2.8 series.

Don't misunderstand, I like Gimp and I really wish it satisfied my needs. But it ain't Photoshop. Not even close. Fortunately for me, CS2 is more than adequate and I have had no problems running it under Wine.

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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by doob9911 » Mon Nov 10, 2014 9:13 pm

BenTrabetere wrote:
MtnDewManiac wrote:You mean this?
-snip-
Yep. Did you notice the GimpUsers post was from May 2012, and that the feature won't be available until v2.10? It's 2-years later and it's still in the v2.8 series.

Don't misunderstand, I like Gimp and I really wish it satisfied my needs. But it ain't Photoshop. Not even close. Fortunately for me, CS2 is more than adequate and I have had no problems running it under Wine.

You don't have to say "I like Gimp".
Linux OS is different from opensource application.
I buy commercial software for linux.
Gimp is terrible. It's slow and lack of feature for casual users.
I have Pixeluvo and I really want Corel Paintshop pro for linux.

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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by all41 » Mon Nov 10, 2014 10:48 pm

This thread has evolved into a very interesting discussion

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Re: How to make Adobe support Linux

Post by InkKnife » Fri Nov 14, 2014 9:00 pm

Talk about stacking proprietary on top of proprietary. :(
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